Arts & Life

1:48pm

Mon August 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Phyllis Diller, Legendary Comedian, Is Dead

In this May 20, 1966 file photo, comedian Phyllis Diller appears in character in the ABC-TV comedy series "The Pruitts of Southampton."
AP

Phyllis Diller, who was known for her trademark self-deprecating humor and laugh, has died at 95.

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12:00pm

Mon August 20, 2012
The Salt

White House Dinner Rewards Kids Who Eat (And Cook) Their Veggies

Originally published on Mon October 15, 2012 9:02 am

First Lady Michelle Obama chats with Illana Gonzales-Evans from Washington at the first Kids State Dinner.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

No one said it would be easy to sell kids on quinoa and kale, but an invitation to the White House's first Kids State Dinner today, complete with fresh fruit topiaries and balloon animals, turned out to be just the ticket for some.

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6:48am

Mon August 20, 2012
The Salt

How Much Does A Hamburger Cost? That Depends

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:38 am

Crunching the numbers to show the environmental cost of a hamburger isn't easy, and we should know.
iStockphoto.com

1:26am

Mon August 20, 2012
Crime In The City

Robert Crais: LA Is A 'Natural Canvas' For Nightmare

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 11:50 am

The canals in LA's Venice neighborhood serve as the scene of a murder in Robert Crais' 2011 novel, The Sentry.
David McNew Getty Images

It's been a few decades, and many published books, but Robert Crais can tell you exactly when mystery writing first caught his attention: He was a bright 15-year-old living in Baton Rouge, La., when he read Raymond Chandler's The Little Sister, which depicted the shady side of sunny Los Angeles through the eyes of private investigator Philip Marlowe.

Since then, Crais has found huge success with his own crime novels, also set in LA. The city is the perfect canvas for a modern mystery, and Crais' eyes still grow wide when he talks about what Chandler painted on it.

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1:25am

Mon August 20, 2012
Art & Design

Hopper's Pensive Lady In Pink Travels The World

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 11:50 am

Edward Hopper's wife, Josephine N. Hopper, served as his model for 1952's Morning Sun.
Columbus Museum of Art/Howald Fund

It's one of the ultimate images of summer: a woman in a short, pink slip sits on a bed, her knees pulled up to her chest, gazing out a window. Her hair is tucked back into a bun. Her bare arms rest lightly on her bare legs.

Edward Hopper painted her in 1952 for a work called Morning Sun. The picture has been widely reproduced for decades. But on a recent visit to its home at the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus, Ohio, it was nowhere to be found.

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