Arts & Life

3:08pm

Tue May 8, 2012
The Salt

From Weed To Whimsy: Chefs Conquer Wild Foods With Butter And Oil

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 3:58 pm

In another era, this plate of Spanish mackerel topped with wild tamarack, basswood leaves, garlic mustard, fiddlehead ferns, and knotweed might seem cheap. Not anymore.
Courtesy of Leif Hedendal

At 8:30 p.m. last Friday, Mark Andrew Gravel was watching nervously as 40-odd assembled diners in the exposed brick basement of the Wythe Hotel in Williamsburg, Brooklyn plunged their forks into a plate of food he had just served.

This plate was piled with a curious combination of sunchoke (known to some as Jerusalem artichoke), olive, cattail heart, buttermilk, and whey.

Read more

11:07am

Tue May 8, 2012
The Picture Show

The Visual South, Part II: Photography Is Like Chicken

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:48 am

"Letter Never Sent" is Hamrick's most recent hand-bound series. "The viewer has an intimate relationship with the book by holding it, feeling its textures and turning its pages, instead of just standing across the room staring at it," he says.
Frank Hamrick

The current issue of Oxford American magazine, known as "the Southern magazine of good writing," is nicknamed the "Visual South Issue." In its 100 under 100 list, the magazine identifies "the most talented and thrilling up-and-coming artists in the South." This week, we'll take a look at five of the photographers on that list.

Read more

10:41am

Tue May 8, 2012
Remembrances

Sendak's Legacy: Helping Kids 'Survive Childhood'

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:49 am

Sendak talks with children about his book Where the Wild Things Are at the International Youth Library in Munich in June 1971.
Keystone/Hulton Archives Getty Images

When author and illustrator Maurice Sendak entered the world of children's books, it was a very safe place. Stories were sweet and simple and set in a world without disorder. But Sendak, who died Tuesday at age 83, broke with that tradition. In Where the Wild Things Are, Sendak explored the darker side of childhood. Upstairs in young Max's bedroom, a jungle grows, and he sails off to a land of monsters.

Read more

10:29am

Tue May 8, 2012
Arts & Culture

Oskar Blues Hopes to Brew Success on the East Coast

Oskar Blues delivery truck
Daquella manera Creative Commons/Flickr

We’re just a few days into May, but it’s already shaping up to be a busy month for Colorado craft beer. Last week Longmont-based Oskar Blues announced that it would be opening its first facility outside Colorado, with plans to open a new location in Brevard, North Carolina.

Read more

10:05am

Tue May 8, 2012
The Two-Way

What's Your Favorite Sendak Memory?

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 10:30 am

'Where the Wild Things Are' by Maurice Sendak.
NPR

The death of children's author Maurice Sendak has brought back many memories for many of us.

This blogger remembers nephew Ben reading Where the Wild Things Are back in the late '60s and being fascinated by what seemed to be a very different, much more interesting, kind of book than I'd been used to as a kid just a few years before.

Read more

Pages