Arts & Life

2:21pm

Thu May 10, 2012
Author Interviews

'Freeman': A Liberated Slave In Search Of Family

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 8:50 pm

A new novel from writer Leonard Pitts Jr. jolts you back to the chaos of post-Civil War America. At a time when families of slaves were freed — but not necessarily together.

In hope of reuniting with their families, some freed slaves placed classified ads in newspapers:

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1:32pm

Thu May 10, 2012
The Salt

Thomas Jefferson's Vegetable Garden: A Thing Of Beauty And Science

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:48 am

Thomas Jefferson's garden at Monticello served as an experimental laboratory for garden vegetables from around the world.
Leonard Phillips Thomas Jefferson Foundation at Monticello

When you listen to All Things Considered host Melissa Block's story about Thomas Jefferson's garden, you'll hear how he cared about putting peas on the table and sharing seeds with his friends. He also set loftier goals for his vegetable garden: Monticello's south-facing expanse was a living laboratory for a lifelong tinkerer and almost obsessive record keeper. Jefferson was, in many ways, a crop scientist.

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12:49pm

Thu May 10, 2012
Movie Interviews

'Where Do We Go?' Lebanese Women Pave The Way

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 8:50 pm

Muslim and Christian women team up to try everything imaginable to distract their men from war in the Lebanese film Where Do We Go Now? Director and actress Nadine Labaki plays the lead role of Amale.
Rudy Bou Chebel Sony Pictures Classic

Where Do We Go Now? is the brainchild of bloodshed. The film, which has been a megahit in the Middle East, is a bittersweet comedy about a group of women determined to stop their hotheaded men from starting a religious war. It's the second feature film from Lebanese director Nadine Labaki.

When violence erupted on the streets of Beirut in 2008, Labaki saw neighbors, friends, people who were practically brothers turn against each another. As the world around her spiraled out of control, Labaki discovered she was having a baby.

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10:54am

Thu May 10, 2012
The Salt

Why It Matters That California Teens Eat Less Than Their Peers

California teens are getting fewer calories because of restrictions on school snacks, a study says
Darko Radanovic iStockphoto.com

The California sunshine can't hurt. It may help keep teens outdoors where they're less likely to snack, and more likely to move around.

But this isn't the explanation for why teens in the Golden State eat 158 fewer calories a day than kids in other states.

California teens, it turns out, are eating less at school, according to a new study in the Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine. And that little bit less per kid can add up to big calorie savings over time, nutrition experts say.

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12:57am

Thu May 10, 2012
Movies

'Dark Shadows': The Birth Of The Modern TV Vampire

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 9:20 am

In the influential Dark Shadows, a 1960s ABC soap opera with a gothic and supernatural bent, Jonathan Frid played Barnabas Collins, a vampire who returned to claim his coastal Maine manor.
Dan Curtis Productions The Kobal Collection

When it comes to monsters on television, vampires have the market more or less cornered. Think about it: Buffy the Vampire Slayer, True Blood, The Vampire Diaries ...

Vampires' enduring popularity on TV may not be eternal, but they have been appearing on the small screen for decades. Mark Dawidziak, who's written books about vampires and teaches a class at Kent State University on their appearances in film and TV, says that part of the way vampires have remained a force in popular culture is through their evolution on TV.

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