Arts & Life

12:19pm

Mon April 2, 2012
The Salt

French Muslims Ease Cultural Tensions With French-Halal Food

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 12:21 pm

A butcher shop in Paris, which prominently advertises that it sells halal meat.
Michel Euler AP

9:05am

Mon April 2, 2012
Arts & Life

Fashion's New 'It' Girl ... And Boy: Andrej Pejic

During a recent photo shoot, Andrej Pejic poses on a rooftop in New York City. The 20-year-old has modeled both menswear and women's wear for some of the world's top designers.
Richard Drew AP

2:00am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Salt

What's Inside The 26-Ingredient School Lunch Burger?

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 9:23 pm

Maggie Starbard NPR

Thiamine mononitrate, disodium inosinate, pyridoxine hydrochloride.

Why are these hard-to-pronounce ingredients added to everything from a burger served in schools to veggie burgers in the frozen food aisle of the grocery store? We try to answer that on this edition of Tiny Desk Kitchen.

It turns out the answers are as varied as the ingredients. But as we yearn to know what's in our food and how it's made, these kinds of ingredients with unfamiliar names make people suspicious.

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10:01pm

Fri March 30, 2012
Monkey See

Snow White Rising: Why This Princess, And Why This Moment?

Originally published on Tue April 3, 2012 12:44 pm

Lily Collins plays Snow White in Mirror Mirror opposite Julia Roberts as the vain Queen jealous of Snow's beauty.
Jan Thijs Relativity Media

Snow White is having a moment.

The new movie Mirror Mirror stars Julia Roberts as the Evil Queen. In June, another Snow White movie opens starring another Oscar winner, Charlize Theron, in the same role. And Disney is working on a new animated film loosely based on Snow White set in 19th-century China. So what makes Snow White so right for right now?

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3:26pm

Fri March 30, 2012
The Salt

Is That A Crushed Bug In Your Frothy Starbucks Drink?

The tiny white insects that feed on cactus turn into red cochineal when crushed. Starbucks uses the dye in some of its products.
Flickr via Wikimedia Commons

Call it the tempest in the Frappuccino. Some Starbucks patrons have been distressed to learn that the chain's Strawberry and Creme Frappuccino owes its pink coloring to crushed insects.

The coloring in question, cochineal, is made from a tiny white insect, Dactylopius coccus. When crushed, its body exudes a brilliant red color. Cochineal has been used as a coloring for foods and makeup for centuries.

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