Author Interviews

4:25am

Sat April 21, 2012
Author Interviews

'Steinbeck In Vietnam': A Great Writer's Last Reports

Originally published on Sat April 21, 2012 8:46 am

The last piece of published writing from one of America's greatest writers was a series of letters he sent back from the front lines of war at the age of 64.

John Steinbeck's reports shocked readers and family so much that they've never been reprinted — until now.

Steinbeck won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1962 for a life's work writing about those who had been roughed up by history — most notably his Depression-era novels, Of Mice And Men and The Grapes of Wrath. Four years later, Steinbeck left for Vietnam to cover the war firsthand.

Read more

5:00am

Mon April 16, 2012
Author Interviews

Author Susan Orlean Talks Writing, the Legacy of Rin Tin Tin

Simon & Schuster

Our fascination with dogs seems like something born out of the modern era of Animal Planet and YouTube. But through the story of Rin Tin Tin, author Susan Orlean explores the roots of this obsession, which started after WWI.

Read more

4:01am

Sat April 14, 2012
Author Interviews

'Heretics': The Crisis Of American Christianity

iStock Photo

The United States ranks as the most religious country in the developed world. And New York Times columnist Ross Douthat says that despite our politics, debates and doubts, this country is as God-besotted today as ever.

But in his new book, Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics, Douthat argues that religion has fallen into heresy (hence the feisty subtitle). Douthat recently spoke with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about why he thinks American Christianity has become distorted.


Interview Highlights

Read more

1:24am

Tue April 10, 2012
Author Interviews

Carole King, From Doo-Wopper To Chart Topper

Originally published on Tue April 10, 2012 5:16 am

Carole King was in a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines when she was a teenager.
Jim McCrary

Carole King has an armful of Grammy Awards and countless Top 10 hits, both under her own name and as a songwriter for artists from Little Eva to the Monkees to Aretha Franklin.

Her solo album Tapestry spent 15 weeks at the top of the charts, becoming one of the biggest-selling records of all time. King managed to fit in all those hits by starting very, very young. She tells NPR's Renee Montagne that she was just 15 when she and some classmates formed a doo-wop group called the Co-Sines.

Read more

1:37pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Author Interviews

Ignore 'The Mama's Boy Myth': Keep Your Boys Close

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 5:16 pm

Author Kate Stone Lombardi is the recipient of six Clarion awards. She has written for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
Nancy Borowick

There are plenty of pop culture references to the dangers of a close mother-son relationship. From the myth of Oedipus to the movie Psycho, narrative after narrative harps on the idea that mothers can damage their sons, make them weak, awkward and dependent.

But for millions of men, the opposite has turned out to be true, author Kate Lombardi tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. Lombardi — a mother herself — is the author of the new book, The Mama's Boy Myth: Why Keeping Our Sons Close Makes Them Stronger.

Read more

Pages