Basketball

2:20pm

Sun March 17, 2013
The Two-Way

Whose Bubble Will Burst? Men's Basketball Brackets Coming Up

Originally published on Sun March 17, 2013 5:14 pm

Julian Gamble of the Miami Hurricanes driving to the basket during his team's win Sunday over North Carolina. The 'Canes are ACC champions. Both teams will be in the NCAA tournament.
Chris Keane Reuters /Landov

We followed the news as the field was announced for this year's NCAA Men's Division I basketball championship and then topped things off with a little "advice" for those who enjoy filling brackets (obviously, wink-wink, The Two-Way does not endorse betting in office pools).

Update at 7:07 p.m. ET. So, How To Choose?

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7:50am

Fri March 15, 2013
Race

Game Of Change: Pivotal Matchup Helped End Segregated Hoops

Originally published on Fri March 15, 2013 8:14 pm

Mississippi State's Stan Brinker (53) and Loyola's Jerry Harkness (15) shake hands before the NCAA Mideast regional semifinal college basketball game in East Lansing, Mich., on March 15, 1963. The game was a landmark contest between the schools that helped alter race relations on the basketball court.
Loyola University Chicago AP

During the March Madness of 1963, playing was infused with politics. The NCAA matchup between Loyola University of Chicago and Mississippi State helped put an end to segregated basketball. Loyola's win 50 years ago became known as the "game of change."

At the time, college basketball was still predominantly white, with usually no more than two or three black players appearing on the floor at any one time. But in '63, the Loyola Ramblers' starting lineup featured four black players.

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1:21am

Wed March 6, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Catholic Universities See True Path To Salvation: Basketball

Originally published on Wed March 6, 2013 9:18 am

DePaul, Georgetown, Marquette, Providence, St. John's, Seton Hall and Villanova universities have decided to leave the Big East Conference and pursue a new basketball framework.
Todd Taulman iStockphoto.com

I've always felt it's no coincidence that some basketball powerhouses — let us say, off the top of my head, Duke, Kentucky, Kansas and Indiana — get a few better players because those hoops museums don't do very well with football.

I mean, if I were a big-deal high school recruit, I might very well say to myself, "You know, I'd rather be a Hoosier or a Wildcat or a Jayhawk than I would go someplace where I'm just gonna be a lounge act for the glamorous Mr. Touchdowns."

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3:45pm

Tue March 5, 2013
Sports

No Obvious Favorites As NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament Starts

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 4:20 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR.

Every spring, you hear that almost anyone can win March Madness. Well, this year, it's true. There's no obvious favorite in this month's NCAA men's basketball tournament, at least a dozen contenders from schools big and small. And conference championships began today. So who knows which contender will fall on its face and which dark horse no one considered will emerge in the next two weeks?

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3:18am

Tue March 5, 2013
Author Interviews

To 'Sum It Up': A Legendary Basketball Coach Braves Alzheimer's

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 8:21 am

Pat Summitt celebrates the Lady Vols' first national championship, in 1987. Summitt says it took seven Final Four losses to learn how to win one.
J. Miles Cary Courtesy of the Knoxville News-Sentinel

The image of Pat Summitt for many fans is that of a madwoman, decked out in orange, yelling to her players from the sideline. In 38 years as the head coach of the University of Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team, Summitt shouted her team to more victories than any other coach in the history of college basketball — men's or women's.

Now the famously fierce coach is facing an opponent unlike any other: In 2011, she was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's disease.

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