Bolivia

10:41am

Thu August 1, 2013
The Salt

Where In The World Are There No McDonald's?

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 1:03 pm

Chinese consumers have 1,075 McDonald's locations to choose from, but the variety inside the restaurant isn't exactly top of their tastes-- KFC does much better business here because Chinese diners prefer white meat over beef patties.
felibrilu via Flickr

Recent news out of Vietnam intrigued us here at The Salt. Ho Chi Minh City is set to get its first McDonald's sometime in the next year, according to the company.

It seems Vietnam is ready for the iconic American food, and McDonald's is confident that Vietnamese consumers now have enough disposable income to get hooked on shakes, burgers and fries.

That got us thinking about the global reach of one of the world's most iconic food companies.

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11:47am

Wed July 17, 2013
The Salt

Your Love Of Quinoa Is Good News For Andean Farmers

Originally published on Wed July 17, 2013 4:15 pm

Farmer Geronimo Blanco shows his quinoa plants in Patamanta, Bolivia, in February. A burgeoning global demand for quinoa has led to a threefold price increase since 2006.
Juan Karita AP

Quinoa lovers have been put on a bit of a guilt trip with stories suggesting that the increased demand in the U.S. has put the superfood out of reach for those living closest to where it's grown.

How can poor Bolivians in La Paz afford to pay three times more for quinoa than they would pay for rice, critics have asked?

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6:26am

Sat July 6, 2013
The Two-Way

If Snowden Tries To Get To Latin America, Cuba Could Be Key

Originally published on Sat July 6, 2013 7:22 pm

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden, who spilled secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, has been condemned by U.S. officials. But he's been praised by some people around the world. In Berlin this week, supporters carried his picture at a demonstration.
Ole Spata DPA /LANDOV

Update at 9:22 p.m. ET. Snowden Reveals Documents On Brazil:

Amid requests and offers of asylum in Latin America, Edward Snowden has apparently released documents showing that the U.S. spied on millions of emails and phone calls of Brazilians. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro tells our Newscast Desk the report, published in the Rio de Janeiro paper O Globo, was co-written by Glenn Greenwald, who has been covering the National Security Agency's programs.

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4:43pm

Wed July 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Morales Returns To A Latin America Fuming Over Plane Snub

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:12 am

A man burns the French flag outside France's embassy in La Paz, Bolivia, Wednesday. Bolivia's President Evo Morales is returning home late today, after his plane was not allowed to fly in the airspace of France and other countries.
Juan Karita AP

Bolivian President Evo Morales is scheduled to land in his home country late tonight, a day after his return journey from meetings in Moscow was disrupted when several European nations withdrew permission for his plane to fly through their airspace.

The delay of more than 13 hours reportedly stemmed from suspicions that Edward Snowden, the former U.S. intelligence worker who leaked secret data, might have been aboard the plane.

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