Concussion

7:53am

Wed February 29, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Teens Fare Worst After Concussions

In teens' developing brains, a concussion can cause more disruption.
iStockphoto.com

Concussions affect the thinking of teenagers more than they do that of adults or children, according to a new study. But all three age groups show lasting problems with working memory after sports concussions.

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12:57pm

Fri February 3, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Many Hits, Rather Than A Big One, Pose Greatest Concussion Risk

Members of the Jefferson High School football team took 200 to more than 1,800 hits to the head in a season.
Purdue University

High school football players have changes in their brain function long before they have recognizable signs of a concussion, according to a new study.

The more hits a player got, the more brain function changed. The findings support the growing belief that a concussion comes as the result of a succession of insults, not just one bad hit.

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5:40am

Sat January 28, 2012
Simon Says

A Fan's Notes On Pro Sports, Brain Damage

Originally published on Sat January 28, 2012 11:31 am

Trainers help Cleveland Browns quarterback Colt McCoy after he took a hit during a game in December. In a series of interviews with The Associated Press, 23 of 44 NFL players said they would try to hide a brain injury rather than leave a game.
Don Wright AP

I will watch the Super Bowl next weekend, along with several billion other people. I expect to cheer, shout and have some guacamole.

But as a fan, I'm finding it a little harder to cheer, especially for my favorite football and hockey players, without thinking: They're hurting themselves.

Not just breaks and sprains but dangerous, disabling brain damage.

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3:11pm

Wed February 2, 2011
Health

Doctors Throw Flags On High School Concussions

In the Super Bowl this weekend, any player who takes a shot to the head and shows signs of a concussion will be taken out of the game. But it's a different story for high school athletes, who sometimes play on despite a head injury.

So the NFL, the American College of Sports Medicine and a long list of other groups are joining together to support state laws designed to protect the brains of young athletes.

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10:00pm

Sun November 28, 2010
Health

Parents, Coaches Worry About Concussion Risks

Student athletes are bigger and stronger than they were a decade ago, and they play rougher. The increased concern about concussion risks in NFL players has parents, coaches and doctors worried about the risk of head injury in kids' sports. Concussions are now the second most common injury in kids' sports, and there's some evidence that girls may be more likely to end up in the emergency room than boys.

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