Congress

2:14pm

Thu March 22, 2012
It's All Politics

Insider Trading Ban Passes Congress, But Some See Missed Opportunity

Originally published on Thu March 22, 2012 5:59 pm

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, shown in August 2011, criticized the STOCK Act that passed Thursday, saying it didn't go far enough.
Brian Ray AP

The Senate passed a bill Thursday to explicitly ban insider trading by members of Congress and the executive branch, and that means the Stop Trading on Congressional Knowledge Act is headed to the president's desk.

But this STOCK Act is quite a bit weaker than earlier versions.

The STOCK Act has been on a glide path ever since an explosive 60 Minutes story last fall highlighted the issue of members of Congress apparently profiting on nonpublic information.

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1:00pm

Thu March 22, 2012
Politics

After House, Senate Pushes JOBS Act Through

Originally published on Thu March 22, 2012 4:05 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

There was a bipartisan spirit on Capitol Hill today. The U.S. Senate voted to approve two major bills and a number of judges. One of those bills was the JOBS Act. The bill seeks to streamline regulations and make it easier for smaller companies to raise money and go public. The idea being that it will encourage job growth. The bill passed by an overwhelming majority.

But as NPR's Sonari Glinton reports, bipartisanship isn't always pretty.

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7:15am

Tue March 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Rep. Ryan Says New GOP Budget Plan 'Offers Real Solutions Again'

Originally published on Tue March 20, 2012 9:22 am

6:00am

Sat March 17, 2012
NPR Story

Who Will Rule In Congress? A Look At The Races

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 8:07 am

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

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9:39am

Fri March 16, 2012
Politics

Debate Over Afghanistan Returns To Capitol Hill

Originally published on Sun March 18, 2012 8:07 am

A U.S. soldier watches members of the Afghan Public Protection Force arrive at a ceremony on the outskirts of Kabul on Thursday.
Ahmad Jamshid AP

Fallout is expected on Capitol Hill next week over what appears to be a killing spree by a U.S. soldier that took the lives of 16 civilians in Afghanistan.

With House members returning from a break, top U.S. commander in Afghanistan Gen. John Allen is set to testify before both the House and Senate armed services committees.

And just as the nation is divided over the war in Afghanistan, so too is Congress.

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