Drought

7:50am

Thu April 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Drought Means 20 Million People In England Can't Use Hoses

No hoses, please. (2006 file photo from Knutsford, England.)
Christopher Furlong Getty Images
  • Larry Miller, reporting for the NPR Newscast

The words "hosepipe ban" popped up in a lot of headlines today, and since we'd never seen that phrase before we wondered what was going on.

It turns out that 20 million people in south-east England, including London, have been told they can't use hoses to water their gardens, wash their cars, fill their pools, clean their patios and a variety of other things (the BBC has a Q&A on what's allowed and not allowed).

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5:00am

Tue April 3, 2012
Environment

State Climatologist: Warm & Dry Conditions Expected to Continue in April

Grace Hood

March’s hot and dry weather has put 98 percent of the state in varying levels of drought. Some of the worst areas right now are in the Arkansas Basin—central and south Colorado—in addition to the northwestern part of the state. KUNC’s Grace Hood sat down with state climatologist Nolan Doesken to find out how we got here, and where the state might be headed in April.

1:44am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Two-Way

The Historic Texas Drought, Visualized

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 11:00 am

Click here to explore the StateImpact interactive." href="/post/historic-texas-drought-visualized" class="noexit lightbox">
Click here to explore the StateImpact interactive.
NPR

A devastating drought consumed nearly all of Texas in 2011, killing livestock, destroying agriculture and sparking fires that burned thousands of homes. It was the worst single-year drought in the state's recorded history.

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6:00am

Sun October 30, 2011
Africa

Kenya-Somalia Tension Rises Amidst Drought

Originally published on Sun October 30, 2011 10:45 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

In drought-stricken East Africa, Somali militants have vowed war on neighboring Kenya. It happened after Kenya sent hundreds of troops across the border to search out and destroy Islamist militants. The cross-border action followed a series of kidnappings and attacks in Kenya, targeting aid workers and Western tourists. Kenya now says its forces won't leave Somalia until the threat is over.

NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton is in Kenya's capital of Nairobi, and joins us now.

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12:41pm

Tue September 20, 2011
Water

Bountiful Water Supply for Much of Colorado This Year

CO Water Science Center USGS

Federal climate scientists say the next three months will be tough for drought-plagued Texas and some neighboring states, including Colorado.

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