Drought

5:30am

Fri April 5, 2013
Agriculture

Colorado Farmers Scramble To Find Irrigation Water

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's go now to the Great Plains, where farmers are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They are scrambling to find irrigation water, which is scarce in the midst of the region's persistent drought. In eastern Colorado, thirsty cities have gobbled up water rights for decades, selling what they don't need back to farmers.

As Luke Runyon from member station KUNC reports, the agreement only works when water is plentiful.

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8:54am

Thu April 4, 2013
Agriculture

Thirsty Cities Drain Colorado Farm Land

Fourth generation farmer Kent Peppler will have a hard time securing irrigation water this year. The ongoing drought has forced cities to hold on to their supplies, leaving farmers like Peppler to fallow some of his fields in Mead, Colorado.
Credit Luke Runyon / KUNC and Harvest Public Media

Farmers throughout the Great Plains are preparing for what could be a tough growing season. They’re in a tight spot with irrigation water, due to the region’s persistent drought.

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6:00am

Wed April 3, 2013
Environment

When It Comes to Water Restrictions Cities Use More Carrots, Less Sticks

Robert S. Donovan Creative Commons

Denver and Fort Collins have started mandatory watering restrictions response to persistent drought conditions. Greeley and Colorado Springs are expected to follow suit. Residents who violate the law could be fined as much as $1,000.

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1:43pm

Tue April 2, 2013
Around the Nation

In Missouri, Days Of Drought Send Caretakers To One 'Big Tree'

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:52 am

This bur oak, called "The Big Tree" by Missouri locals, has been around for centuries. When a drought hit the state last year, the community came together to offer help and water for the iconic tree.
Courtesy of Christopher Starbuck

The devastating drought in the Midwest last summer is a story often told by the numbers, with statistics on large crop failures, days without rain and thousands of parched acres.

This story is also about a tree — a bur oak in rural Columbia, Mo., that everyone calls "The Big Tree." Although it's survived all kinds of punishments during its 350 years on the prairie, last year's record drought was especially tough.

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1:20pm

Thu March 21, 2013
The Two-Way

NOAA Predicts Warmer Than Normal Spring For Most Of U.S.

A map showing above-normal temperatures in an orange hue. Below-normal temperatures are shown in blue.
NOAA

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