Energy

6:34am

Fri June 8, 2012
The Two-Way

Chesapeake Energy CEO In Hot Seat Today

Chesapeake Energy CEO Aubrey McClendon.
Scott Detrow StateImpact/Pennsylvania

The NBA finals aren't the only big news in Oklahoma City.

This morning, shareholders of Chesapeake Energy, the natural gas driller at the center of the nation's hydraulic fracturing controversies, are meeting in Oklahoma City, where the company is headquartered. But the buzz at this gathering won't be about fracking or basketball. It will be about Aubrey McClendon, Chesapeake's controversial CEO.

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3:51pm

Thu May 31, 2012
Energy

Gulf Refinery Expansion May Not Cut Gas Prices

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 5:44 pm

Expanding the refinery at Port Arthur, Texas, took five years and $10 billion. The facility can now process 600,000 barrels a day.
Motiva Enterprises

In Texas recently there was a grand opening for what is now the largest refinery in the U.S. Shell and Saudi Arabia's national oil company, Saudi Aramco, have more than doubled the capacity of their Port Arthur refinery.

The refinery business has been going through a tough period in recent years. Americans are buying less gasoline and other petroleum products — about 10 percent less than in 2005, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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2:01pm

Mon May 28, 2012
Asia

For Future Energy, Volcanic Indonesia Bets On Heat

Originally published on Mon May 28, 2012 9:30 pm

A local resident entertains visitors to the Kawah Kamojang geothermal field in West Java. He puts a length of bamboo to the steam coming from the ground to make a whistle, then throws soda cans into the vent, which shoots them high into the air. The Dutch colonial government drilled Indonesia's first geothermal wells at Kamojang in 1926, when the country was still known as the Dutch East Indies.
Yosef Riadi for NPR

Indonesia, the country with the world's largest number of active volcanoes, is betting that all the hot rocks will provide a clean and reliable energy source for the future.

The country is believed have 40 percent of the world's geothermal energy resources. But making geothermal energy economically feasible will require adjusting the country's heavily subsidized energy prices. And that issue is a political hot potato.

Unused Potential

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9:49am

Mon May 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chief Will Resign

Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Gregory Jaczko waits for the beginning of a joint hearing before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee and Clean Air and Nuclear Safety in December.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Gregory B. Jaczko, the chairman of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, announced he would resign as soon as his replacement is confirmed.

"After an incredibly productive three years as Chairman, I have decided this is the appropriate time to continue my efforts to ensure public safety in a different forum," Jaczko said in a statement today. "This is the right time to pass along the public safety torch to a new chairman..."

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1:26pm

Fri May 18, 2012
Energy

Pipeline Flip Turns U.S. Oil World 'Upside Down'

Originally published on Fri May 18, 2012 4:34 pm

The U.S. oil boom has created a glut of crude in Cushing, Okla., a major oil storage hub. This sign dubs the city the "Pipeline Crossroads of the World."
Jeff Brady NPR

For years, Cushing, Okla., has been on the receiving end of a 500-mile pipeline funneling oil from the Gulf of Mexico to the American heartland.

Starting this weekend, that pipeline will start moving crude in the other direction. That flow reversal could soon have implications at gas pumps around the country.

"For 40 years, crude oil flowed north," says Philip Verleger, a visiting fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. "Today, oil flows south. It's as if we turned the world upside down."

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