Finance

4:02pm

Mon March 19, 2012
The Two-Way

U.S. Makes $25 Billion In Mortgage-Backed Securities Sale

The U.S. Treasury said today that it had made $25 billion from the sale of mortgage-backed securities it bought back during the financial crisis. The Treasury said the sale was part of its effort to wind down the bailout programs.

The AP reports:

Read more

9:50am

Wed March 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Goldman Sachs Starts To Fire Back At Exec Who Quit In Scathing Op-Ed

Originally published on Wed March 14, 2012 12:25 pm

Chris Hondros Getty Images

Greg Smith is a fairly ordinary name — but it's now one that's all the talk of Wall Street after he quit his position at Goldman Sachs today in one of the most amazingly public ways:

With an essay in The New York Times that accuses Goldman Sachs of having a money-is-everything culture that is "toxic and destructive."

Read more

7:15am

Wed March 14, 2012
Planet Money

Goldman Sachs Exec: 'People Talk About Ripping Their Clients Off'

Chris Hondros Getty Images

Greg Smith, an executive director at Goldman Sachs, is resigning today after 12 years at the firm. He has a scathing op-ed in this morning's NYT, running under the headline "Why I Am Leaving Goldman Sachs":

Read more

3:41pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Economy

Birthplace Of 'Robo-Signing' Eyes Deal Critically

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 4:57 pm

A for-sale sign hangs in front of a Homestead, Fla., home. In 2009, Florida lawyer Tom Ice deposed a bank employee who admitted to signing hundreds of mortgage documents in a day without reading them.
J. Pat Carter AP

From the beginning, Florida lawyer Tom Ice says he realized the mass signing of mortgages was more than just a paperwork problem.

"I suspected then, and I suspect now, that we were really just touching the tip of the iceberg," he says.

Read more

10:01pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Crisis In The Housing Market

Potential Conflicts At Freddie Mac Draw Scrutiny

In December, Freddie Mac CEO Charles Haldeman (from left), FHFA acting Director Edward DeMarco and Fannie Mae CEO Michael Williams testified on Capitol Hill about the Federal Housing Finance Agency's performance.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

A federal Inspector General's office confirmed Wednesday it is looking into Freddie Mac investments that act as bets against homeowners being able to refinance.

In addition, U.S. senators are expected to probe Freddie Mac's investment practices at a hearing on Capitol Hill on Thursday.

Freddie Mac, based in northern Virginia, is the taxpayer-owned mortgage giant whose public mission is to make homeownership more affordable for Americans.

Read more

Pages