Florida

11:17am

Thu March 22, 2012
The Two-Way

'Stand Your Ground': Miami Judge Decides Fatal Stabbing Was Self Defense

Greyston Garcia.
florida.arrests.org

With Florida's "stand your ground law" in the spotlight, we want to point to a decision taken yesterday by a Miami-Dade county judge in the case of Greyston Garcia, who was facing second-degree murder charges.

Here's what we know about the case, according to The Miami Herald:

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6:15am

Thu March 22, 2012
The Two-Way

After Trayvon Martin's Death, We're All Having 'The Talk'

When he was killed on Feb. 26, Trayvon Martin was said to be wearing a hooded sweatshirt. In New York City on Wednesday, hundreds of people gathered for a "Million Hoodies" march to call attention to his death.
Mario Tama Getty Images
  • From 'Morning Edition,' on 'The Talk'

11:12am

Wed March 21, 2012
U.S.

Florida Teen's Killing: A Parent's Greatest Fear

Originally published on Tue April 30, 2013 3:21 pm

Brandon Northington (right) a FAMU law student chants, "Do I look suspicious?" while holding a bag of Skittles during a rally Monday at the Seminole County Courthouse in Sanford, Fla. Trayvon Martin was holding the candy when he was shot and killed.
Red Huber MCT /Landov

The fatal shooting in Florida of an unarmed black teenager at the hand of a neighborhood watch captain has ignited national furor over racial profiling and vigilante justice.

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8:50am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Jeb Bush Endorses Romney

Then-governors Mitt Romney (left) of Massachusetts and Jeb Bush of Florida in 2005. Bush has endorsed his fellow Republican's presidential bid.
Steven Senne AP

One day after Mitt Romney's win in Illinois and the talk that has again raised about the former Massachusetts governor being the "inevitable" Republican presidential nominee, he's picked up the coveted endorsement of former Florida governor Jeb Bush.

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7:47am

Wed March 21, 2012
U.S.

Was Trayvon Martin's Killing A Federal Hate Crime?

A memorial to 17-year-old Trayvon Martin outside the community in Sanford, Fla., where the teen was shot.
Roberto Gonzalez Getty Images

Civil rights groups cheered the news that the Justice Department would look into the case of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed black teen shot by a man on neighborhood watch in Sanford, Fla.

But the bar for the Justice Department to make a federal case is high. Ultimately, it has few options at its disposal when it comes to investigating the teen's death.

Former prosecutors say one key tool passed early in the Obama administration might apply in this case: the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

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