Food & Food Culture

12:11pm

Thu January 10, 2013
The Salt

Moroccans Celebrate A Bountiful Year For Date Harvest

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 3:38 pm

A Moroccan date harvester sorts his yield, which was well above average this year.
Jeff Koehler for NPR

In the heart of the Moroccan oasis and palm grove of Skoura, west of Marrakesh, yellow and reddish dates dangled heavily from branches high above us. It's going to be a good year, a man harvesting dates said, offering me a handful of fresh, still-yellow fruit cut from the tree just moments before.

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9:13am

Thu January 10, 2013
The Salt

Artist's State-Shaped Steaks Explore Beef's Origins

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 11:14 am

Sarah Hallacher came up with the idea to represent the beef industry as "raw" steaks while she was researching on the web about where her own steak dinner came from.
Courtesy of Sarah Hallacher

If there's one thing we love more than talking about beef here at The Salt, it's visualizing the U.S.'s insatiable appetite for meat through infographics and charts.

So when we ran across Sarah Hallacher's Beef Stakes project over at Fast Company's Co.Design blog, our eyes lit up like the charcoal grill on Super Bowl Sunday.

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3:39am

Thu January 10, 2013
Europe

Rubles For Minutes, Not Mochas, At Russian Cafe Chain

Originally published on Thu January 10, 2013 1:04 pm

Tsiferblat, or Clockface Cafe, in Moscow draws a young crowd, from students to entrepreneurs. The cafe provides Wi-Fi, printers, books and art supplies. Drinks, snacks, atmosphere and the space are free. All customers pay for is time.
Courtesy Of Diana Derby

Cafe life has taken hold in modern Russia. From Starbucks to local chains such as Kofe Khaus and Schokoladnitsia, there are lots of places to hang out, see and be seen.

It's a striking change in a country where, in Soviet times, the best an ordinary comrade could expect was a mug of tea in a workers canteen.

The world over, the basic contract between cafe and customer is this: You buy a drink or a snack, and you get to use the premises for as long as it takes to consume it.

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1:12pm

Wed January 9, 2013
The Salt

How Google Earth Revealed Chicago's Hidden Farms

Originally published on Fri January 11, 2013 12:14 pm

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Uncommon Ground, a certified green restaurant in Chicago, hosts an organic farm on its rooftop.
Zoran Orlic of Zero Studio Photography Uncommon Ground

Cities have plenty of reasons to care about how much food is being produced within their limits — especially now that community and guerrilla gardeners are taking over vacant urban lots across the country. But most cities can only guess at where exactly crops are growing.

And in Chicago, researchers have found that looks — from ground level, anyway — can be very deceiving when it comes to food production.

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10:11am

Wed January 9, 2013
The Salt

Kids Who Play Food Product Games May Eat More Junk Food

Originally published on Wed January 9, 2013 11:02 am

Many popular food games for computers and devices like tablets are actually "advergames", created by food manufacturers to market their products to kids.
iStockphoto.com

Some kids can't get enough of online games where they can pretend to run a candy factory or decorate cakes. But children who play with these games may eat more, and eat more junk food, even if the game features fruit or other healthful choices, according to new research.

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