Food & Food Culture

9:48am

Mon January 6, 2014
Business

Cheerios GMO-Free Decision Mostly About Marketing

Boxes of the oat-based cereal Cheerios will soon sport a GMO-free label, a move that wasn't hard to make.
Credit laffy4k / Flickr/Creative Commons

A popular breakfast cereal will soon sport a label on its familiar yellow box declaring it free of genetically modified ingredients, both a win for anti-GMO activists and the mark of a big food company looking to tap into a niche market for its product.

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1:49pm

Thu January 2, 2014
The Salt

Cork Versus Screw Cap: Don't Judge A Wine By How It's Sealed

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 4:18 pm

Winemakers are increasingly turning to screw caps. Now consumers are learning to get over their prejudice for cork, too.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Step aside, cork.

If you're a wine drinker, you've probably noticed that screw caps are no longer considered the closure just for cheap vino. Increasingly, bottles of very good wines are unscrewed, rather than uncorked.

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3:22am

Thu January 2, 2014
The Salt

Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:53 pm

With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S.
Christine Hochkeppel Courtesy of Cape Cod Times

Good luck finding local cod in Cape Cod, Mass.

The fish once sustained New England's fishing industry, but in recent years, regulators have imposed severe catch limits on cod, and the fish remain scarce.

"I've never seen cod fishing this bad," says Greg Walinsky, who has been fishing on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. "It looks to me like it's over. And I can't catch any codfish."

It's so bad, many fishermen say, that for the first time, they cannot catch enough cod to even reach shrinking government quotas.

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3:22am

Thu January 2, 2014
The Salt

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 8:27 am

A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff.
Charlie Neibergall AP

It's a quandary of food production: The same drive for efficiency that lowers the cost of eating also can damage our soil and water.

Take the case of one simple, essential chemical element: phosphorus.

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1:53am

Thu January 2, 2014
The Salt

Food As Punishment: Giving U.S. Inmates 'The Loaf' Persists

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 1:49 pm

Lisa Brown for NPR

In many prisons and jails across the U.S., punishment can come in the form of a bland, brownish lump. Known as nutraloaf, or simply "the loaf," it's fed day after day to inmates who throw food or, in some cases, get violent. Even though it meets nutritional guidelines, civil rights activists urge against the use of the brick-shaped meal.

Tasteless food as punishment is nothing new: Back in the 19th century, prisoners were given bread and water until they'd earned with good behavior the right to eat meat and cheese.

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