Food Safety

3:12pm

Tue June 11, 2013
The Salt

Tender Beef, Without The Pathogens: USDA Proposes Labeling Rules

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 4:27 pm

Meat tenderized the old-fashioned way. The industrial method is a mechanized process involving needles.
iStockphoto.com

In order to make tough cuts of beef more tender, the industry uses a mechanical tenderizing process that involves piercing the meat with needles.

This is effective in breaking up the tough muscle fibers, but there's a downside, too: a higher risk of surface bacteria making their way into the cut of meat, which can set the stage for food poisoning. That's a particular concern when it comes to the center of meat cuts, which don't get heated to the same temperatures as the exterior.

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4:21pm

Wed June 5, 2013
Health

Health Officials Expect More Cases From Hepatitis Outbreak

Packages of frozen berries from Oregon-based Townsend Farms, labeled as "antioxident blend," are being investigated as the cause of a multi-state outbreak of hepatitis A, including a dozen cases in Colorado.
Credit Wikiphoto

12:29pm

Wed June 5, 2013
The Salt

Keeping Hepatitis A Out Of Frozen Berries Starts At The Farm

Frozen berries have been implicated in a hepatitis A outbreak.
iStockphoto.com

The news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that at least 49 people in seven states have gotten hepatitis A from eating organic frozen berries has given our smoothie-making some pause.

Frozen berries are full of health-promoting compounds; plus, they're convenient and delicious. So we wondered: Is there a way to keep all those positives, and hold the virus? We checked with food safety experts to find out.

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4:24pm

Wed May 22, 2013
The Salt

In Raw Milk Case, Activists See Food Freedom On Trial

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 3:59 pm

Supporters say Wisconsin farmer Vernon Hershberger's trial isn't just about raw milk: It's also, they say, about the right to get foods from farmers without government intervention.
Toby Talbot AP

What is the case against Wisconsin farmer Vernon Hershberger really about? It depends on whom you ask.

To hear the prosecution, it's about licensing, not raw milk: Hershberger, a dairy farmer hailing from the town of Loganville, is on trial this week for operating without three licenses. He's also accused of continuing to sell raw milk to members of his private club after he was ordered not to.

If convicted, the father of 10 faces more than a year in jail and more than $10,000 in fines.

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11:15am

Thu May 16, 2013
The Salt

How Trace Amounts Of Arsenic End Up In Grocery Store Meat

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 9:18 am

Roxarsone, a drug linked to elevated levels of inorganic arsenic in chicken meat, is no longer used in broiler chicken farming, producers say. But another arsenic-based drug is still used to raise turkeys.
iStockphoto

A study published online recently in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives documented slightly elevated levels of arsenic in samples of chicken purchased at grocery stores in 10 cities in the U.S.

So how did trace amounts of this toxin end up in supermarket poultry?

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