Germany

3:15pm

Sun May 13, 2012
Economy

EU's Financial Crisis Doesn't End At Nations' Borders

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 9:11 pm

Demonstrators shout slogans during a protest to mark the anniversary of the "Indignados" movement in Madrid, Spain on Sunday. Tens of thousands of Spaniards took to the streets to protest the handling of the country's worst crisis in decades.
Alberto Di Lolli AP

In the streets and public squares across Spain on Saturday night, the cries of a mass movement calling itself the Indignados rang out, railing against austerity measures imposed by the European Union.

In Greece the next morning, Alexis Tsipras, the head of a far-left opposition party, held a news conference to say he wouldn't join a coalition government that continued the path of austerity.

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3:09pm

Sun May 13, 2012
NPR Story

Opposition Wins Major State Vote In Germany

Originally published on Sun May 13, 2012 4:52 pm

Voters in Germany's most populous state, North Rhine Westphalia, have delivered a major blow to the ruling party, the Christian Democrats, led by Chancellor Angela Merkel. Weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz talks with Michael Kolz, the chief political reporter for German station Phoenix, about why the results in North Rhine Westphalia matter and what they mean for the left-wing Social Democrats.

3:21am

Tue May 8, 2012
Economy

Germany Stays The Course On Austerity Measures

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 5:41 am

The elections in France and Greece signaled a resounding popular rejection of the tough austerity measures being pushed by Germany, Europe's largest economy. But Berlin doesn't appear to be changing course.

1:48pm

Mon May 7, 2012
Europe

Germany Faces Backlash Against Austerity Moves

Originally published on Tue May 8, 2012 6:26 am

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has been the leading voice for austerity in Europe. But election results over the weekend showed a voter backlash. Merkel said Monday that she still supported the austerity moves.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

German Chancellor Angela Merkel made all the right gestures Monday: the obligatory phone call congratulating French President-elect Francois Hollande. She vowed that the two will "work together well and intensively." And she invited Hollande to Berlin after his inauguration and said she would welcome him "with open arms."

But clearly the French election results mark a setback for Merkel and her goal of solving Europe's economic crisis with financial austerity.

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2:37am

Tue May 1, 2012
Business

Siemens Changes Its Culture: No More Bribes

Originally published on Tue May 1, 2012 4:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Wal-Mart faces many questions after The New York Times reported that the company's expansion in Mexico involved systematic bribery. It is not, however, the first corporation to face this problem.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Years ago, Siemens - the giant German manufacturing firm - faced an even bigger scandal. Siemens is a little like General Electric. It seems to make everything everywhere, from security equipment to locomotives.

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