Health

4:31pm

Thu June 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

As China Gets Richer, First World Diseases Take Hold

Students paste red ribbons on a window to mark World AIDS Day in Nanjing, China, in 2006. Although many infectious diseases have declined in the country, the number of new HIV cases nearly quadrupled between 2007 and 2011.
AP

Has the economic boom in China been good for the Chinese people? When it comes to health, the answer, on average, is yes.

China isn't just jockeying with the U.S. for superpower status. Chinese are also starting to have the same health problems as Americans, says a study published Thursday in The Lancet.

China has managed to beat back the plagues of poverty, such as diarrhea, pneumonia, measles and malaria, which kill millions of kids each year in low-income countries.

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4:03pm

Thu June 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Girl's Need Breathes Life Into Debate Over Organ Allocation

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:38 pm

Sarah Murnaghan, on May 30, as she and her parents marked the 100th day of her stay in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
Murnaghan family AP

The case of a Pennsylvania girl who is dying from cystic fibrosis has sparked an emotional debate over how the nation allocates lungs for transplantation.

Ten-year-old Sarah Murnaghan is in intensive care at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia awaiting a lung transplant. Under the current rules, lungs from adults are offered to other adults and adolescents before being offered to children younger than 12.

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2:18pm

Thu June 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

Even A Small Change In Habits Helps Fend Off Stroke

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 3:07 pm

Your brain will appreciate even a modest improvement in stroke risk factors.
iStockphoto.com

This is not one of those posts that is going to beat you up for doing a crummy job exercising, eating better and all the other things you're failing to do to ward off death.

Instead, this post is here to say that if you improve one thing just one teeny bit, it's going to lower your risk of having a stroke. So pick something, and stick to it.

Stroke, which happens when a blood vessel bursts or is blocked in the brain, is a leading cause of death and disability.

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10:36am

Thu June 6, 2013
The Salt

Feeling A Little Blue May Mask Our Ability To Taste Fat

Originally published on Thu June 6, 2013 2:00 pm

Feeling down? It could be messing with your ability to taste the fat in that carton of ice cream.
Heather Rousseau NPR

So, here's the scenario: You're feeling a little blue, then you watch an emotional movie and dig into a bowl of ice cream.

Are you aware of how fattening your comfort food is? Likely not. Especially in the moment.

A new study finds that temporary, strong emotions, like the sadness we experience from a weepy movie, can significantly decrease our ability to taste — or perceive — the amount of fat we're eating.

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10:05am

Thu June 6, 2013
Shots - Health News

How Nature Builds A Pandemic Flu Virus

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 6:26 am

A vendor weighs a live chicken at the Kowloon City Market in Hong Kong last April. After closing live poultry shops in many cities around China, the rate of new H7N9 infections sharply declined.
Lam Yik Fei Getty Images

Here's a sobering thought: Wild birds — including city pigeons and ubiquitous Canada geese — carry 170 different types of bird flu. You know, all those viruses with the Hs and Ns in their names, like H1N1 and H5N1.

Only a dozen of these viruses have infected humans so far, but many of those have been deadly, and three of them have caused global flu pandemics.

Does every bird flu that leaps into people have the potential to turn into the next "big one" that spreads rapidly around the world?

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