Health

11:23am

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why Some Hospices Turn Away Patients Without Caregivers At Home

Originally published on Thu January 24, 2013 5:56 am

Some hospices require patients to have a caregiver at home. But for many families, that's just not an option.
Guven Demir iStockphoto

Choosing hospice care is never an easy decision. It's an admission that the end is near, that there will be no cure.

But even after a family has opted for this end-of-life care, some still face an unexpected hurdle: Twelve percent of hospices nationwide refuse to accept patients who don't have a caregiver at home to look after them, according to a recent survey of nearly 600 hospice providers published in Health Affairs.

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9:55am

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Old Drug Extends Life For Pancreatic Cancer Patients

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 1:55 pm

A CT scan showing an adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head.
Wikimedia Commons

A large study is providing a rare glimmer of hope for patients with pancreatic cancer, perhaps the deadliest of all malignancies.

By the time they're diagnosed, most patients with pancreatic cancer have advanced disease that's spread to the liver and lung. And the primary tumor may be inoperable because it's wrapped around vital blood vessels and nerves.

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8:02am

Wed January 23, 2013
Series: Losing Ground

Stark Health Disparities For Colorado's Minorities

Six-month-old Isaac Cabanas-Saucedo nibbles on his toe as Dr. Carolyn Chen, a physician at Clinica Family Health Services in Adams County, Colo., examines him on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013
Joe Mahoney The iNews Network

Lucero Barrios is Latina and a new mother –circumstances that place her squarely in a group of people affected by a shocking reality in Colorado: A Hispanic baby born in this state is 63 percent more likely than a white baby to die in the first year of life.

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1:39am

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Rules Would Retire Most Research Chimps

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 1:56 pm

Two chimps groom each other at the Save the Chimps facility in Florida. The National Institutes of Health owns about 360 chimpanzees that aren't yet retired and that are living at research facilities; new guidelines say most of its chimps should be retired.
Save the Chimps

The National Institutes of Health should retire most of its chimps that are currently living in research facilities, according to a working group put together by the NIH to look at the future need for biomedical research on chimps.

The group did recommend keeping a small number of chimps in reserve in case they are needed for studies later on. But it also laid out a detailed description of the kind of living conditions that would be needed for those chimps, and said any proposed research should go through a review committee that includes members of the public.

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1:29am

Wed January 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Painkiller Paradox: Feds Struggle To Control Drugs That Help And Harm

Originally published on Wed January 23, 2013 11:38 am

Carolyn Tuft and her daughter Kirsten (seen here in 2005) were the victims of a shooting at a Salt Lake City mall in 2007. Kirsten was one of five bystanders killed, and Carolyn was left in severe pain.
Courtesy of Carolyn Tuft

A few years ago, a doctor started prescribing Michael Israel painkillers for bad cramps in his gut. Israel had been struggling with Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive disorder, since he was a teenager.

"So he was prescribed, you know, Lortab, or Vicodin or whatever. You know, they would flip-flop it from one to another," says Avi Israel, Michael's father.

Then one day, Michael confessed that something was wrong.

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