Health

1:24am

Mon August 27, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Sleepless Nights May Put The Aging Brain At Risk Of Dementia

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 8:55 am

If you're having trouble sleeping, researchers say you should resist the urge to keep checking the time.
mrsmuckers iStockphoto.com

As we age, our sleep patterns change. We've all heard the complaints: "I wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep!"

Some sleep experts estimate that as many as 40 percent of older adults suffer sleeping problems such as sleep apnea and insomnia. Now, researchers have found a link between disrupted sleep and cognitive decline.

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1:23am

Mon August 27, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Lack Of Sleep, Genes Can Get Sleepwalkers Up And About

Originally published on Mon August 27, 2012 12:44 pm

Though scientists have identified sleepwalking triggers, the condition is still a bit of a mystery.
Victoria Alexandrova iStockphoto.com

Miranda Kelly, a 14-year-old from Sykesville, Md., says she's been sleepwalking since she was 6 or 7. The first time, she says, "I woke up on the couch on a school day. And I'd gone to bed in my bed."

Since that first episode, Kelly now sleepwalks every couple of months. "I wake up in weird places, randomly. I have once woken up in the kitchen, and on the floor of the bathroom wrapped in my sheet," she says.

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12:30pm

Fri August 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Failure Of Lilly Drug Is Latest Alzheimer's Setback

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:19 pm

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease.
U.S. National Institute on Aging Wikimedia Commons

An experimental drug that aimed to slow the development of plaques and help clear them from the brains of Alzheimer's patients failed in two late-stage studies conducted by Eli Lilly & Co., the company said today.

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11:15am

Fri August 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Dire Health Conditions In South Sudan Prompt Airdrops

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 2:32 pm

Families wait for hours to register at the Yida refugee camp in South Sudan along the northern border in early July. Within a few weeks, the population of the camp more than doubled, leading to shortages of food, water and medicine.
Paula Bronstein Getty Images

It's been only a year since South Sudan became an independent nation. But as NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton reported last month, the young county is already facing major challenges.

One of these is a growing population of refugees at the northern border, where conditions have become so dire in the past few weeks that aid workers are now calling it a "health catastrophe."

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8:03am

Fri August 24, 2012
NPR News Investigations

Before Reaching War Zones, Troops Risk Concussions

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 5:47 pm

Staff Sgt. Ronald Sherwood practices a maneuver on Sgt. 1st Class Darwin Scriber at the U.S. Army Combatives School at Fort Benning, Ga. The school trains instructors who will teach recruits hand-to-hand combat. Most of the student instructors have fought in Iraq and Afghanistan.
Pouya Dianat for NPR

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