History

5:22am

Wed January 8, 2014
History

For LBJ, The War On Poverty Was Personal

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:31 am

President Lyndon B. Johnson delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress on Jan. 8, 1964.
AP

President Lyndon Johnson stood in the Capitol on Jan. 8, 1964, and, in his first State of the Union address, committed the nation to a war on poverty.

"We shall not rest until that war is won," Johnson said. "The richest nation on Earth can afford to win it. We cannot afford to lose it."

It was an effort that had been explored under President Kennedy, but it firmly — and quickly — took shape under Johnson.

Read more

12:59am

Fri November 22, 2013
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later

Witnessing History In A Dallas Emergency Room

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:29 pm

Glenda Rike's husband was in the room when President Kennedy received his last rites. She recounted his experience to her son, Larry, on a visit to StoryCorps.
StoryCorps

5:38am

Tue November 19, 2013
History

LISTEN: For Its 150th, A Reading Of The Gettysburg Address

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 8:14 am

President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address as inscribed on the stone at the Lincoln Memorial.
Pat Benic UPI/Landov
  • On 'Morning Edition': The Gettysburg Address put in historical context
  • The Gettysburg Address, read by historian Eric Foner and NPR staff

4:46pm

Fri September 20, 2013
The Two-Way

Document Sheds New Light On The Time The U.S. Almost Nuked Itself

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 4:48 pm

An atomic cloud rises July 25, 1946 during the "Baker Day" blast at Bikini Island in the Pacific.
National Archives Getty Images

"One simple, dynamo-technology, low voltage switch stood between the United States and a major catastrophe."

That is the blunt 1969 assessment of Parker F. Jones, the then supervisor of the nuclear weapons safety department at Sandia National Laboratories, in a newly declassified document that sheds light on a 1961 accident in which the United States almost nuked North Carolina.

Read more

1:04am

Tue September 10, 2013
History

Remembering A 'Brave,' 'Lucky' Hero In The War Of 1812

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 5:08 am

The U.S. Brig Niagara is a replica of the ship Oliver Hazard Perry sailed to victory. The Niagara carries four carronades, or short-range cannons. The original ship was outfitted with 18 carronades that could shoot a 32-pound ball about half a mile.
Ryan Whaley Green Door Mediawork

Two hundred years ago today, a young U.S. naval captain named Oliver Hazard Perry penned the words, "We have met the enemy and they are ours ..."

Perry's remarkable victory over the British changed the course of the War of 1812, and a full-scale re-enactment — the largest sailing re-enactment ever attempted in the U.S. — recently commemorated the anniversary of the win in the Battle of Lake Erie.

A Bit Of History

Read more

Pages