History

2:44pm

Sat September 1, 2012
Author Interviews

Following The Footnotes Of The Revolutionary War

Originally published on Sat September 1, 2012 4:37 pm

In his book, Robert Sullivan considers, among other things, how little Emanuel Leutze's 1851 painting Washington Crossing the Delaware has in common with the actual historic crossing, which took place at night and during a snowstorm.
Metropolitan Museum of Art AP

When we think of the seminal moments in the birth of the United States of America, many people would point to the battles of Lexington, Concord and Bunker Hill. But according to Robert Sullivan, the founding landscape of our nation is not in Massachusetts. It is in and around New York.

In his new book, My American Revolution: Crossing the Delaware and I-78, Sullivan writes that the majority of battles in the Revolutionary War were fought in the middle colonies: New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania.

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4:58am

Fri August 31, 2012
Europe

Family Finds Medieval Well Under Their House

Originally published on Fri August 31, 2012 10:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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1:50am

Fri August 24, 2012
Science

Web Cartoonist Raises $1 Million For Tesla Museum

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 11:12 am

Tesla reads in front of the spiral coil of his high-frequency transformer at his lab on Houston Street in New York.
Marc Seifer Archives

The only remaining laboratory of one of the greatest American inventors may soon be purchased so that it can be turned into a museum, thanks to an Internet campaign that raised nearly a million dollars in about a week.

The lab was called Wardenclyffe, and it was built by Nikola Tesla, a wizard of electrical engineering whose power systems lit up the Chicago World's Fair in 1893 and harnessed the mighty Niagara Falls.

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2:46pm

Wed August 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Confederate Soldier In Famous Portrait Is Identified

Originally published on Wed August 22, 2012 5:43 pm

Stephen Pollard of Carroll County, Ga., who fought and survived the Civil War.
Library of Congress

The Washington Post brings us an interesting story about a portait that was donated to the Library of Congress.

As far as portraits from the Civil War go, this one is quite famous. It shows a confederate soldier looking a bit disheveled and very serious while holding an 1855 Springfield single-shot pistol carbine.

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9:22am

Wed August 22, 2012
Planet Money

Photos: How Dollar Bills Were Made A Century Ago

Hand-run printing presses like these in 1909 produced 45 sheets an hour, while today's automated machines churn out 10,000 in the same amount of time. "This was considered the toughest job at the time," said Franklin Noll, a historical consultant at the U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing. "You had to work as fast as you could all the time on a rate where you only got paid for the good sheets."
Library of Congress

Every day, tens of millions of crisp, green bills roll off fast, automated presses at the U.S. Bureau of Printing and Engraving.

A hundred years ago, the process looked very, very different. Back then, it took the bureau a year to make as many bills as it can now make in two days.

These beautiful, old photographs from the Library of Congress were taken near the turn of the 20th century. They show a time when making currency was a slow, hands-on process.

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