History

4:21am

Sat July 28, 2012
Author Interviews

Before The D-Day Invasion, Double Talk And Deceit

Originally published on Sat July 28, 2012 5:52 am

Allied troops invade Juno Beach on D-Day. Ben MacIntyre's latest book, Double Cross, recounts the grand deception beforehand that helped make the invasion a success.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Early in 1944, Southern England bristled with 150,000 American, British and Canadian soldiers gathered for an invasion the Allies hoped would end World War II.

The soldiers, pilots, sailors and Marines knew they were there to be launched into Nazi-occupied Europe. But surely the Germans knew also. It's hard to hide the largest invasion force in history. LIFE Magazine even ran photos of GIs in Piccadilly.

The question was: Where would they attack?

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4:49pm

Wed July 18, 2012
History

Leadville Sinkhole Reveals Town’s Mining Heritage

CDOT Facebook Page CDOT

The town of Leadville has a growing problem. A 100-foot deep sinkhole has shut down traffic between the city and the Vail valley where many residents commute to work every day. But this is more than your average sinkhole.

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10:10am

Wed July 11, 2012
History

Sinkhole Near Leadville Turns Out To Be Century-old Railroad Tunnel

CDOT Facebook Page CDOT

With the summer travel season well underway in Colorado, US24 north of Leadville is now closed by a little bit of history. A long forgotten and collapsed railroad tunnel finally revealed itself with a sinkhole.

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3:46am

Sun June 17, 2012
Around the Nation

States Stake Claim On Sir Francis Drake's Landing

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 11:23 am

Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.
Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger

Oregon and California are locked in a dispute over something that happened 433 years ago, when Sir Francis Drake became the first British explorer to make contact with Native Americans.

It happened on what is now the American West Coast. The question is where? Oregon or California? The National Park Service is now poised to officially recognize one state's claim.

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10:03pm

Sat June 16, 2012
Theater

The Stage On Which Juliet First Called Out For Romeo

Originally published on Sun June 17, 2012 1:05 pm

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology recently excavated the site of the 16th-century Curtain Theatre, where Shakespeare staged some of his plays.
Museum of London Archaeology AP

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of the Bard's old stomping grounds — ruins of a famous 16th-century theater, buried below the streets of modern London. Known in its heyday as the Curtain Theatre, it's often been eclipsed by its more famous younger sibling, the Globe.

But the Curtain is a big deal in its own right. Some of Shakespeare's most famous works premiered there — Romeo and Juliet and Henry V, just to name a couple. NPR's Rachel Martin talked to the archaeologist who dug up the theater, Chris Thomas of the Museum of London.

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