History

2:19pm

Sun April 15, 2012
History

Lost And Found: Rare Paul Revere Print Rediscovered

A rare engraving by Paul Revere surfaced recently in a library at Brown University, where it had been nestled in the pages of a book for centuries.
Brown University

The 237th anniversary of Paul Revere's famous midnight ride during the Revolutionary War falls on Wednesday. But long before Henry Wadsworth Longfellow made him famous, Revere was known as an engraver and a silversmith in Boston.

Brown University announced this week that it had found a rare engraved print by Revere, one of only five in existence. The print was tucked inside an old medical book that had been donated by physician Solomon Drowne, a member of Brown University's class of 1773.

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12:32pm

Sun April 15, 2012
History

'Violins Of Hope': Instruments From The Holocaust

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 8:28 am

Amnon Weinstein prepares a violin from the Holocaust for exhibit. He began restoring the violins in 1996 and now has 30 of them to display in an exhibit called Violins of Hope.
Nancy Pierce

Amnon Weinstein first encountered a violin from the Holocaust 50 years ago. He was a young violin maker in Israel, and a customer brought him an old instrument in terrible condition and wanted it restored.

The customer had played on the violin on the way to the gas chamber, but he survived because the Germans needed him for their death camp orchestra. He hadn't played on it since.

"So I opened the violin, and there inside there [were] ashes," Weinstein says.

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9:17am

Fri March 30, 2012
History

1940 Census Release Is 'Super Bowl For Genealogists'

In 1940, the federal government sent 120,000 census takers across America to ask questions like, "Do you live on a farm?" and "Where were you living on April 1, 1935?"
Hansel Mieth/Time Life Pictures Getty Images

10:01pm

Sun January 8, 2012
History

Dancing Through History With First Ladies' Gowns

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 9:09 am

First lady Michelle Obama's inaugural gown.
Hugh Talman Courtesy of the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History

Every four years in January, Washington, D.C., plays host to the country's biggest "prom." Inaugural balls bring out happy winners, administration bigwigs and a gown — on the first lady — that will become a part of history.

An exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History displays some of those gowns. NPR Special Correspondent Susan Stamberg took her dance card to the show.

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5:08pm

Mon May 23, 2011
History

NY Public Library Celebrates 100 Years Of Open Doors

The New York Public Library on opening day, May 24, 1911.
Library of Congress

The staff at the New York Public Library made some noise Monday while celebrating a major birthday. The library's main building in Manhattan opened to the public exactly 100 years ago.

Ever since, the iconic neo-classical building has welcomed readers from all over the world.

It's also 100 years of Patience and Fortitude: the names of the lion statues that stand guard on the steps of the New York Public Library on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan.

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