Insects

8:12am

Fri October 5, 2012

6:24am

Fri October 5, 2012
The Two-Way

Sacre Bleu! French Bees' Taste For M&Ms Makes For Colored Honey

Originally published on Fri October 5, 2012 9:32 am

We knew the Honey Nut Cheerios bee liked sweet stuff. But imagine what would happen if he met green M&M?
Doug Kanter/Rusty Jarrett AFP/Getty Images

Why were their bees producing honey in shades of blue and green, wondered beekeepers in the Alsace region of France?

The answer, according to France 24 and Le Monde, was that the bees apparently like M&M's.

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2:48pm

Wed October 3, 2012
Movies

'Flight': A Few Million Little Creatures That Could

Originally published on Thu October 4, 2012 8:19 am

"Supergenerations" of monarch butterflies migrate over 2000 miles from Canada to Mexico.
SK Films

A young boy in Canada wondered where butterflies go in the winter — and spent 40 years trying to answer that question.

In 1973, Dr. Fred Urquhart — all grown up by then — placed an ad in a newspaper in Mexico looking for volunteers to tag and observe butterflies and find their destination. A woman named Catalina Aguado and her American husband, Kenneth Brugger, answered that ad. They spent two years searching in remote parts of Mexico.

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2:16pm

Sun September 23, 2012
Around the Nation

Rare Specimens: An Unusual Match-Up In Entomology

Originally published on Sun September 23, 2012 4:16 pm

Entomologists Alma Solis and Jason Hall specialize in moths and butterflies, respectively.
Marty Ittner Friends of Sligo Creek

Alma Solis, a researcher at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Systematic Entomology Lab, and her husband, Jason Hall, a researcher with the Smithsonian's Natural History Museum, are, at first blush, a natural match.

Both are entomologists, a career that requires long hours, field work and travel for months at time — all without huge pay. But the couple soon learned that though they shared a passion, they did not share a specialty.

Hers: moths.

His: butterflies.

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3:04pm

Wed September 19, 2012
Science

Hungry Snakes Trap Guam In Spidery Web

Originally published on Wed September 19, 2012 6:09 pm

Invasive brown tree snakes have gobbled up most of Guam's native forest birds. Without these avian predators to keep their numbers in check, the island's spider population has exploded.
Isaac Chellman Rice University

The Pacific Island of Guam is experiencing a population explosion — of spiders.

There are more spiders there now than anyone can remember. To get a sense of how weird the situation is, I started out in Maryland. On my front porch, overlooking the Severn River.

At 6:30 in the morning on a cool fall day, I find two spider webs in a matter of five minutes. But if I were on the island of Guam, I might find 70 or 80 spider webs in five minutes.

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