Iran

4:58am

Fri September 6, 2013
World

Report: 'Iran Plots Revenge' If U.S. Strikes Syria

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 7:31 am

A U.S. Navy F/A-18F Super Hornet prepares to launch from the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz earlier this week in the Red Sea. The ship is among U.S. military assets in the region.
Nathan R. McDonald UPI/Landov
  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Scott Horsley reports from the G-20 Summit

"The U.S. has intercepted an order from Iran to militants in Iraq to attack the U.S. Embassy and other American interests in Baghdad in the event of a strike on Syria," The Wall Street Journal reports.

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4:18pm

Sun September 1, 2013
History

Declassified Documents Reveal CIA Role In 1953 Iranian Coup

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 4:44 pm

Former Iranian Premier Mohammed Mossadegh appears in October 1951. The CIA's overthrow of Mossadegh was a template for the agency's covert operations going forward.
AP

The Central Intelligence Agency was behind the overthrow of Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadegh in 1953. It's been an open secret for decades, but last week, The George Washington University's National Security Archive released newly declassified documents proving it.

Orchestrating the Iranian coup d'état was a first for the CIA and would serve as the template for future Cold War covert operations worldwide.

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8:21am

Mon August 26, 2013
World

New Details On How U.S. 'Helped Saddam As He Gassed Iran'

Then-Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein (at right) behind an artillery piece during the Iraq-Iran war. (An undated photo from the 1980s.)
Reuters/Landov

Newly declassified CIA documents "combined with exclusive interviews with former intelligence officials, reveal new details about the depth of the United States' knowledge of how and when Iraq" used chemical weapons against Iran in the 1980s, Foreign Policy reports.

According to the magazine:

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2:52pm

Sun August 25, 2013
Books

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 5:14 am

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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6:21am

Sun August 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Iran's New President: U.S. Wants 'Excuse' To Confront Tehran

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 9:42 am

Iran's new President Hassan Rowhani sits next to the national flag on his first official day in office in Tehran on Saturday.
Atta Kenare AFP/Getty Images

Hassan Rouhani, Iran's newly elected president, is being sworn-in on Sunday, succeeding the controversial Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, whose focus on the country's nuclear program proved a constant source of tension with the West.

Rouhani, 64, is viewed as a moderate and has pledged greater openness on the country's nuclear program. However, the former chief nuclear negotiator for Tehran appeared late Saturday to be reading from the same script as his predecessor:

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