Ireland

12:57am

Mon June 17, 2013
Crime In The City

In Neville's Thrillers, Belfast's Violent Past Still Burns

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 11:13 am

Bonfires light up the Belfast skyline on July 12, 1997, as Protestant loyalists commemorate the 17th century victory of a Protestant king over his deposed Catholic predecessor. Known as the Battle of the Boyne, the confrontation is part of a long history of tensions in the region.
Paul McErlane AP

At 41, with long black hair, Stuart Neville looks more like the rock guitarist he used to be than the author he is now. He lives in a small town with his family — not in Belfast, Northern Ireland, the city that plays a central role in his thrillers, but just outside it.

Read more
Tags: 

2:52pm

Tue June 4, 2013
Author Interviews

McCann's 'TransAtlantic' Crosses Fiction And Fact, Ireland And U.S.

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 4:22 pm

Colum McCann won the National Book Award in 2009 for Let the Great World Spin.
Dustin Aksland

About five years ago, Colum McCann stumbled upon a small piece of history he had never known: In 1845, Frederick Douglass, then an escaped slave who was already famous for his anti-slavery writings and speeches, visited Ireland to raise money and support for his cause. McCann says he knew almost immediately that he wanted to turn this historical fact into fiction: "This intersection between history and fiction, between what is real and what is not real, fascinates me," he says.

Read more

8:23am

Fri May 24, 2013
The Two-Way

James Joyce Coin-troversy Reportedly Could Have Been Averted

A commemorative 10-euro coin featuring James Joyce bears an image of the author that his literary estate did not approve. It also misquotes his work.
Irish Central Bank

Irish banking officials should have known there were problems with the controversial 10-euro coin commemorating James Joyce, according to Ireland's RTE News. The coin misquotes the author's Ulysses, and bears an image of Joyce that his estate did not approve.

Read more
Tags: 

8:52am

Wed May 22, 2013
The Salt

How Genomics Solved The Mystery Of Ireland's Great Famine

This illustration from 1846 shows a starving boy and girl raking the ground for potatoes during the Irish Potato Famine, which began in the 1840s.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

An international group of plant pathologists has solved a historical mystery behind Ireland's Great Famine.

Sure, scientists have known for a while that a funguslike organism called Phytophthora infestans was responsible for the potato blight that plagued Ireland starting in the 1840s. But there are many different strains of the pathogen that cause the disease, and scientists have finally discovered the one that triggered the Great Famine.

Read more

1:07am

Wed May 22, 2013
Planet Money

Why Apple (And Lots Of Other Companies) Wound Up In Ireland

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 7:35 am

Andy Wong AP

Apple was criticized in a Senate committee hearing Tuesday for using complex accounting to minimize the corporate taxes it pays. One key piece of the company's tax strategy: It funnels lots of its profits through subsidiaries in Ireland.

Offering low corporate tax rates has been a fundamental part of Ireland's economic strategy for decades — a way to get foreign companies to set up operations in the country.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages