Japan

5:40am

Mon March 12, 2012
Asia

Ferrari Driver Gets Himself In Trouble With The Law

Originally published on Mon March 12, 2012 7:51 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Social media sure make the job of police easier. A Japanese doctor is the latest to post evidence of his own violation of the law. He said he wanted people to see the beauty of his Ferrari, so he positioned a camera behind the driver's seat and zoomed away. The video showed him driving 77 miles per hour, 52 miles over the speed limit. Angry viewers not only marked dislike on the video, they reported the driver to the police. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Tags: 

2:00am

Mon March 12, 2012
NPR Story

Japan Faces 'Tremendous Challenges Ahead'

Japan is far from back to normal, after an earthquake, tsunami and nuclear disaster devastated the northeastern part of the country a year ago. U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos talks to Steve Inskeep about his latest visit to the hard-hit region of Tohoku.

Tags: 

4:23am

Sun March 11, 2012
Rebuilding Japan

Nuclear Woes Push Japan Into A New Energy Future

A liquefied natural gas tanker arrives at a gas storage station east of Tokyo on April 6, 2009. The shuttering of Japan's nuclear power plants has driven an increased reliance on natural gas and other fossil fuels.
AFP/Getty Images

The tsunami that struck Japan last year destroyed four nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station on the east coast of the country. Radiation spread through the air and into the ocean, and workers labored for weeks to quench the melting reactor cores. Farmland and numerous towns were evacuated and much remains off-limits.

Since then, Japan has been temporarily shutting down its remaining nuclear plants as the public debates whether to swear off nuclear power permanently. But saying no to nuclear has been and will continue to be costly.

Read more

2:32pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Rebuilding Japan

Crippled Japanese Reactors Face Decades Of Work

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:58 am

Last year's earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. Foreign journalists saw cleanup and recovery work in process on Feb. 28.
Yoshikazu Tsuno AFP/Getty Images

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Japan on March 11, 2011, lasted for many terrifying minutes. But the multiple nuclear meltdowns that followed created an emergency that lasted for weeks and a legacy that will last for decades.

Here's how the event unfolded. The tsunami knocked out power to the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. As a result, the cooling systems failed and three reactors melted down. Steam laced with radioactive material poured into the air. Water contaminated with radiation also flowed into the sea.

Read more
Tags: 

1:41pm

Fri March 9, 2012
Rebuilding Japan

For Kids In Japan, Adjusting To A Changed World

Originally published on Fri March 9, 2012 8:22 pm

Students at Tohoku Chosen, an elementary and junior high school for North Koreans in Sendai City, now take dance classes in the school's cafeteria because their main building was destroyed when the earthquake struck northeast Japan last March.
Doualy Xaykaothao NPR

Teacher Dave Rowlands is talking to his students in a kindergarten class at Imagine Japan, an English-language school in the Miyagi Prefecture of Sendai City. The school is just a short walk from pre-fabricated homes built for families who lost more than just property in the earthquake and tsunami last year.

"What came after the earthquake, was what?" Rowlands asks. "A tidal wave. In Japanese, what do we say? Or in English, actually, tsunami is now used around the world in many languages. Tsunami. We kind of leave the 't' off of there."

Read more
Tags: 

Pages