Jobs

4:06am

Fri June 7, 2013
Economy

U.S. Unemployment Rate Inched Up In May

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

There are no big surprises in this morning's job report from the government. The unemployment rate increased slightly on moderate job growth. It met or slightly exceeded expectations. This is one of the most significant economic indicators we look at every month, and joining us to discuss the Labor Department's report is NPR's Yuki Noguchi. Good morning.

YUKI NOGUCHI, BYLINE: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: What can you tell us about these numbers?

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7:04am

Thu June 6, 2013
The Two-Way

Ahead Of Key Report, 2 Modestly Positive Signs On Jobs

The scene at a career fair in San Francisco on May 30.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

The number of first-time claims for jobless benefits fell by 11,000 last week from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports. There were 346,000 such applications.

While on the positive side, the figure is still in line with the recent trend. Since late 2011, claims have basically stayed in a range from the mid-300,000s to just under 400,000.

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7:26am

Wed June 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Job Growth Stayed Slow In May, Report Signals

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 8:04 am

The scene at a jobs fair in Gainesville, Fla., on April 27.
Matt Stamey Gainesville Sun /Landov

3:33am

Wed June 5, 2013
Business

Job Market Remains Challenging For 2013 Graduates

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 7:52 am

For the past five years, graduation day has been a time of apprehension as much as celebration. Prospects for those entering the workforce for the first time were bleak. The class of 2013 — whether from high school or college — has cause for more optimism than previous classes.

12:57pm

Thu May 30, 2013
Shots - Health News

Joblessness Shortens Life Expectancy For White Women

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 2:39 pm

Unemployment can be a health hazard.
unknown iStockphoto.com

At a time when many people live longer, it's been a mystery why white women without a high school diploma have been dying increasingly earlier those with more education.

A study in the June issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior tries to understand this growing mortality gap, and finds two key factors: smoking — already well known as detrimental to life expectancy — and, more surprising, unemployment.

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