Latin America

11:03am

Wed May 9, 2012
Latin America

Mexican Crime Reporters Risk Becoming The Story

Originally published on Thu May 10, 2012 7:37 am

A woman lights a candle during a tribute to slain Mexican journalists at the Monument of Independence in Mexico City on May 5. The vigil took place to protest violence against the press after the brutal murders of four journalists in Veracruz state.
Sashenka Gutierrez EPA/Landov

Mexico is reeling from another round of brutal murders of journalists. Four journalists and photographers who covered the police beat have been killed in eastern Mexico's crime-ridden state of Veracruz.

There's a new call for the federal government to take measures to protect journalists in a country where more and more reporters censor themselves out of fear.

The ceremony to remember the most recent killings took place last weekend in Mexico City on the steps of the Monument of Independence between statues depicting peace and law.

Read more

2:45pm

Wed May 2, 2012
Latin America

Cuba's New Mantra: Viva Private Business

Originally published on Wed May 2, 2012 4:26 pm

Two self-employed florists prepare bunches of flowers in Havana last year. The Cuban government is stepping up economic reforms and estimates that in four or five years, nearly half the workforce will be employed in the private sector.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Socialism has been Cuba's official economic policy for more than a half-century, and some 85 percent of the Cuban workforce is employed by the state.

But that is changing fast. Communist authorities say that nearly half of Cuba's economic activity will shift to the private or "non-state" sector in the next four or five years.

Those plans signal a new urgency to Cuban President Raul Castro's economic reforms, and one reason is that Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, the island's biggest benefactor, is battling cancer and facing re-election in October.

Read more

4:01am

Sun April 22, 2012
Latin America

In Argentina's Oil, A Glimpse Of Latin America's Left

Originally published on Sun April 22, 2012 3:41 pm

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez holds up a petroleum sample as she announces plans for her government to nationalize a giant oil company that is largely owned by a private Spanish company. Behind her is an image of the country's former first lady, Eva Peron.
Daniel Garcia AFP/Getty Images

Just the arrival of Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner prompted supporters in her Peronist movement to break into chants last Monday. The event, choreographed to feel momentous, was at the presidential palace. Fernandez de Kirchner announced plans to expropriate assets of the Spanish oil firm Repsol in Argentina.

Through a window, television viewers could see a huge image of Evita Peron, the famous 1950s-era populist whose presence is deeply felt in today's government.

Read more

7:51am

Fri April 20, 2012
The Two-Way

Princess Cruises: Captain Didn't Know Distressed Fishermen Sighted

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 3:06 pm

The Star Princess cruise ship leaves Buenos Aires' port in Argentina on Jan. 17.
Natacha Pisarenko AP

A "breakdown in communications" kept a cruise liner steaming off the coast of Panama from rescuing a group of fishermen in distress, even after passengers aboard the ship tried to report sighting the vessel, Princess Cruises says.

The cruise line says a preliminary investigation of the incident that led to the subsequent deaths of two of the three fishermen confirms that the captain of the luxury ship never got word that the boat had been spotted.

Read more

3:13pm

Thu April 19, 2012
Latin America

Ignoring Critics, Argentina To Nationalize Oil Firm

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 8:39 am

Argentine President Cristina Fernandez holds a petroleum sample as she announces plans for her government to nationalize a giant oil company that is largely owned by a private Spanish company, Repsol. Behind her is an image of the country's former first lady, Eva Peron.
Daniel Garcia AFP/Getty Images

It's sounds like a story from the past: A Latin American leader announces plans to nationalize a large foreign company, touching off a high-stakes battle that involves money, politics and diplomacy.

Yet it's happening right now. Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez said this week that her country plans to take over a giant Spanish oil company at a time when the economies in both countries are facing challenges.

Spanish officials are threatening to retaliate against Argentina for seizing a majority of shares in the biggest oil company in Argentina, YPF.

Read more

Pages