Maryland

9:29am

Mon September 17, 2012
The Picture Show

Same Camera, Different Century: Capturing Civil War Sites, 150 Years Later

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 4:39 pm

Here's a snapshot from the field as Harrington composed his image of Burnside Bridge — which involved schlepping the huge, fragile camera down a steep incline to get the right perspective.
Claire O'Neill (@clairevoyant) Instagram

Believe it or not, there's a lot of food involved in wet-plate photography. Egg whites (albumen) are used to make the glass plates adhesive to the light-sensitive chemicals. And one way to keep the plates from drying out after processing is to coat them in honey. It's also physically demanding, so you get really hungry.

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1:45am

Mon September 17, 2012
History

Antietam: A Savage Day In American History

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 7:51 am

Between two farm fields in Sharpsburg, Md., there was a sunken road, which Confederates used as a rifle pit until they were overrun by federal troops. The road has since been known as "Bloody Lane."
Library of Congress

On this morning 150 years ago, Union and Confederate troops clashed at the crossroads town of Sharpsburg, Md. The Battle of Antietam remains the bloodiest single day in American history.

The battle left 23,000 men killed or wounded in the fields, woods and dirt roads, and it changed the course of the Civil War.

It is called simply the Cornfield, and it was here, in the first light of dawn that Union troops — more than 1,000 — crept toward the Confederate lines. The stalks were at head level and shielded their movements.

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5:35am

Sun September 16, 2012
History

Reenacting Antietam: Fighting As Family Once Did

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 6:36 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Tomorrow marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War's Battle of Antietam, one of the bloodiest days of any war. In honor of the sesquicentennial, the battle site is hosting a slew of events commemorating the fight. Reporter Jacob Fenston went to Sharpsburg, Maryland, the site of the battle, and brings us this report.

JACOB FENSTON, BYLINE: It started just before dawn.

(SOUNDBITE OF BUGLE PLAYING)

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1:07am

Fri September 7, 2012
Dead Stop

'Gatsby' Author Fitzgerald Rests In A D.C. Suburb

Originally published on Fri September 7, 2012 12:55 pm

The grave of The Great Gatsby author F. Scott Fitzgerald lies next to a major thoroughfare for commuters between Rockville, Md., and Washington, D.C.
Jess Gitner NPR

Every weekday, thousands of commuters to the nation's capital drive past the grave of a celebrated American author, and it's a good bet they don't realize it.

F. Scott Fitzgerald, the author of The Great Gatsby, was born in St. Paul, Minn.; he's associated with that city, as well as Paris, the Riviera and New York. But he's buried in Rockville, Md., outside Washington, D.C., next to a highway between strip malls and train tracks.

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2:32pm

Thu September 6, 2012
NPR Story

Bod Modell Was Hero, Villain To Football Fans

Originally published on Thu September 6, 2012 5:09 pm

Football icon Art Modell has died. Modell was hero to Baltimore Ravens fans because as owner of that NFL team he brought them a Superbowl. But it's a different story in Cleveland, where Browns fans vilify him for moving the team to Baltimore after a dispute with Cleveland political leaders.

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