Mental Health

12:30pm

Fri August 24, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Failure Of Lilly Drug Is Latest Alzheimer's Setback

Originally published on Fri August 24, 2012 1:19 pm

A PET scan of the brain of a person with Alzheimer's disease.
U.S. National Institute on Aging Wikimedia Commons

An experimental drug that aimed to slow the development of plaques and help clear them from the brains of Alzheimer's patients failed in two late-stage studies conducted by Eli Lilly & Co., the company said today.

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1:23am

Mon August 20, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Why Can Some People Recall Every Day Of Their Lives? Brain Scans Offer Clues

Originally published on Mon August 20, 2012 11:50 am

Researchers are using MRI scans to learn more about the brains of people with extraordinary memory.
iStockphoto.com

Six years ago, we told you about a woman, identified as A.J., who could remember the details of nearly every day of her life. At the time, researchers thought she was unique. But since then, a handful of such individuals have been identified. And now, researchers are trying to understand how their extraordinary memories work.

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12:58am

Fri August 17, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Would Judge Give Psychopath With Genetic Defect Lighter Sentence?

Originally published on Fri August 17, 2012 9:06 am

In 1991, a man named Stephen Mobley robbed a Domino's pizza in Hall County, Ga., and shot the restaurant manager dead.

Crimes like this happen all the time, but this particular case became a national story, in part because Mobley seemed so proud of his crime. After the robbery, he bragged about the killing and had the Domino's logo tattooed on his back.

But there was another reason Mobley's case became famous.

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8:52am

Thu August 16, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Grappling With The Uncertainty Of Alzheimer's Testing

When does it make sense to test a person for the risk of an incurable illness?
Andrei Tchernov iStockphoto.com

Counselors have long cautioned about the downsides of genetic testing for Alzheimer's disease.

For one thing, the current genetic tests for late-onset Alzheimer's — the type that develops after age 60 and is responsible for more than 90 percent of cases — only indicate a probability of getting the disease. It's not definitive. And consumers' ability to buy life insurance or long-term care coverage could be jeopardized by the results.

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1:39am

Wed August 15, 2012
Law

The Law — And Reality — Of Gun Access

Originally published on Wed August 15, 2012 4:44 am

Federal law bars gun sales to the mentally ill only if they've ever been deemed by a judge to be mentally incompetent or involuntarily committed. States reporting of such things to the federal database is spotty, and very often, it doesn't show up when a gun seller does a background check.
Gabriel Bouys AFP/Getty Images

Timothy Courtois' family had been worried about him for weeks. They repeatedly told police in Biddeford, Maine, that the 49-year-old was off his meds for bipolar disorder. And police were also told he had guns. But still, because he wasn't doing anything that rose to the legal definition of imminent threat, police said their hands were tied.

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