Mexico

2:11pm

Thu June 7, 2012
Latin America

Mexico's Once Dominant Party Poised For A Comeback

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 3:54 pm

Mexican presidential front-runner Enrique Pena Nieto of the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, waves to the crowds during a campaign stop in the northern border city of Tijuana, Mexico, on June 3. The once dominant PRI, out of power for the past 12 years, looks likely to make a comeback.
Alex Cossio AP

First of two parts

As Mexico approaches its election day on July 1, polls indicate the candidate for the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, is well ahead and appears likely to return his party to power.

The PRI governed Mexico for seven decades until 2000, when it was tossed out by an electorate tired of a corrupt political machine. Now, discontent with the current leadership and the rampant drug-related violence has created an opening for the PRI to come back. Still, some Mexicans are queasy about the prospect of the party's resurgence.

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12:55am

Wed June 6, 2012
Latin America

Female Presidential Candidate Blazes Trail In Mexico

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 10:07 am

Josefina Vazquez Mota, presidential candidate from the ruling National Action Party, or PAN, delivers a speech during an electoral rally in Jocotepec, in the state of Jalisco, in May.
AFP/Getty Images/PAN Press Office

When Mexicans go to the polls on July 1 to choose their next president, a woman will be among the candidates, the first from a major political party. She belongs to the National Action Party — or PAN — the party of current President Felipe Calderon.

On a recent visit to the Mexican border city of Juarez, Josefina Vazquez Mota steps onto a catwalk that juts into the center of a long banquet hall crammed with table after table of women. When she speaks, they cheer.

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10:55am

Tue May 22, 2012
The Two-Way

Mexican Police Arrest 'El Loco' In Beheading Of 49

Army soldiers flank Daniel Ramírez, alias "El Loco," during his presentation to the media in Mexico City on Monday.
Alexandre Meneghini AP

The Mexican military trotted out Daniel Jesus Elizondo Ramírez or "El Loco," yesterday, to face the media. They accused the Zeta leader of directing the mutilation and beheading of 49 people.

Earlier this month, the bodies were dumped at the entrance of the town of San Juan.

The AP reports that Ramírez was directed by the top Zeta leaders to dump the bodies and hang banners around the country that shunned responsibility.

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7:04am

Wed May 16, 2012
Remembrances

A Fleeting Memory Of Carlos Fuentes

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 2:43 pm

Mexican write Carlos Fuentes at the Hay Festival Cartagena in January.
Claudio Rubio AP

When I heard that the Mexican literary legend Carlos Fuentes died Tuesday at 83, I remembered a long, easygoing interview I did with him years ago. We talked about many things — including what epitaph he wanted carved on his tombstone.

It was the autumn of 1995 and I was a reporter at The Washington Post, assigned to write a profile of the elegant, eloquent Fuentes. I draw on that story now, for twice-told tales worth telling.

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7:48pm

Tue May 15, 2012
Remembrances

In Writing, Fuentes Shed Light On Poverty, Inequality

Originally published on Wed May 16, 2012 8:08 am

Mexican author Carlos Fuentes poses for a photo after a news conference in Mexico City on March 12. Fuentes died Tuesday at a hospital in Mexico City. He was 83.
Alexandre Meneghini AP

Carlos Fuentes was the son of a Mexican diplomat and spent years living abroad, including in the United States. But Mexico — the country, its people and politics — was central to his writing.

Fuentes, one of the most influential Latin American writers, died Tuesday at a hospital in Mexico City at the age of 83. He was instrumental in bringing Latin American literature to an international audience, and he used his fiction to address what he saw as real-world injustices.

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