Mississippi

2:17pm

Thu July 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Sequestration Could Curtail 'Hurricane Hunter' Missions

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 4:38 pm

A WC-130J "Hurricane Hunter"
U.S. Air Force

Federal furloughs caused by sequestration could ground "Hurricane Hunter" aircraft, depriving forecasters of real-time measurements of storms during what's expected to be an especially active Atlantic hurricane season.

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3:46pm

Thu July 11, 2013
Author Interviews

Lessons In Bigotry And Bravery: A Girl Grows Up In 'Glory Be'

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:55 pm

In July, NPR's Backseat Book Club traveled to Hanging Moss, Miss., where Gloriana June Hemphill, better known as Glory, is just an ordinary little girl. But this is no ordinary summer — it's 1964 and the town has shut down the so-called "community" swimming pool to avoid integration.

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3:14am

Sat June 22, 2013
Shots - Health News

Political Fight Jeopardizes Medicaid In Mississippi

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 5:11 pm

Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant, a Republican, opposes Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.
Rogelio V. Solis AP

Medicaid and controversy seem inseparable in many states lately. For the most part, the wrangling is about a new wrinkle in Medicaid — the expansion of the health program for the poor and disabled under Obamacare.

Mississippi, though, is raising the stakes. Democrats and Republicans in the state are in a fight, and the outcome could threaten the very existence of the entire Medicaid program there.

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3:12pm

Mon June 17, 2013
Code Switch

How Do You Teach The Civil Rights Movement?

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 7:37 pm

A protestor is carried away from a demonstration in Jacksonville 50 years ago.
Jim Bourdier AP

Note: As part of NPR's series on the summer of 1963, reporter Cory Turner headed to Jackson, Miss. to take a look at how folks are teaching the Civil Rights movement to kids who weren't a part of it — and making the lessons stick.

Much has changed in the past 50 years, since the height of the Civil Rights movement. But how do you teach the Civil Rights to kids who haven't ever experienced it? In Jackson, Miss., Fannie Lou Hamer Institute's Summer Youth Workshop tackles that question.

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10:39am

Wed June 12, 2013
The Two-Way

50 Years Later, Medgar Evers' Widow Relives The Pain

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:12 am

Keynote speaker Myrlie Evers-Williams at Wagner College's commencement ceremony on May 24.
Jan Somma-Hammel Staten Island Advance /Landov

As NPR's Debbie Elliott has reported for Morning Edition and on the Code Switch blog, "for Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers, the memories of 1963 are still raw."

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