Music Interviews

2:03pm

Sat April 21, 2012
Music Interviews

Pogo: Harnessing The Innate Rhythm Of Pop Culture

Originally published on Sun May 6, 2012 9:38 am

5:29pm

Wed April 18, 2012
Music Interviews

Anoushka Shankar: A Sitar Player In Andalusia

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 6:41 am

"There's a very primal, emotional response I feel when I hear flamenco," sitar player Anoushka Shankar says. "It's quite in the belly in a way."
Harper Smith

Anoushka Shankar is the daughter and protege of the renowned Indian sitar player Ravi Shankar, who is credited with introducing Indian classical music to Western audiences. Now, Anoushka Shankar carries on this tradition in more ways than one. On her new album, Traveller, she goes back in time to make the connections between India and Spain.

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2:11pm

Tue April 17, 2012
Music Interviews

Kat Edmonson 'Just Wasn't Made For These Times'

Originally published on Tue April 17, 2012 4:30 pm

"As usual, the party in my imagination is much grander than the actual one," Kat Edmonson says of the song "Champagne."
Courtesy of the artist

A lot of the songs on Kat Edmonson's new album, Way Down Low, have a timeless sound, due in part to her own timeless-sounding voice. But she isn't above revealing her influences: The song "Champagne," she admits, was crafted with a particular American songsmith in mind.

"I was trying to write a song like Cole Porter," Edmonson tells NPR's Melissa Block. "Me and a million other people are trying to write a song like Cole Porter."

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4:04am

Sun April 15, 2012
Music Interviews

The Toure-Raichel Collective: 'Two Chefs In The Kitchen'

Idan Raichel (left) and Vieux Farka Toure's new collaborative album is The Tel-Aviv Session.
Nitzan Treystman Courtesy of the artist

Idan Raichel first met Malian guitar luminary Vieux Farka Toure in a chance encounter at an airport in Germany. Raichel, an Israeli pop star and keyboard player, had admired Toure's work— as well as that of his father, the late Ali Farka Toure — for many years before they crossed paths.

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3:04pm

Fri April 13, 2012
Music Interviews

The Magnetic Fields: 'Out Late At A Bar, Writing A Song'

Stephin Merritt (far left) has led The Magnetic Fields since the early 1990s, with a songwriting style that ranges from sincere to bitter to ironic.
Marcelo Krasilcic

For more than 20 years, the indie-pop group The Magnetic Fields has been singing songs about love, though not always in the traditional sense. With a style that ranges from bitter to sincere to ironic, Stephin Merritt — the group's frontman, writer and producer — has created a growing cast of characters surviving love's vicissitudes.

In his characteristic deadpan, Merritt tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer that he owes the inspiration for many of those characters to a particular ritual of his.

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