National Security

12:59am

Thu April 26, 2012
National Security

Could Iran Wage A Cyberwar On The U.S.?

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 7:21 am

Cybersecurity experts say Iran has the resources necessary to be a major player in cyberwarfare.
iStockphoto.com

Security professionals in both the U.S. government and in private industry have long feared the prospect of a cyberwar with China or Russia, two states capable of launching destructive attacks on the computer networks that control critical assets such as the power grid or the financial system.

Now they face a new cyberthreat: Iran.

"[The Iranians] have all the resources and the capabilities necessary to be a major player in terms of cyberwarfare," says Jeffrey Carr, an expert on cyberconflict who has consulted for the U.S. Department of Defense.

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1:36am

Tue April 24, 2012
National Security

U.S. Military Wages Battle Against Misconduct

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 3:18 am

The Marines' most senior officers — including top commander Gen. James Amos (shown here in 2011 in Afghanistan's Helmand province) — are weighing in on recent incidents involving misconduct by troops serving in Afghanistan.
Bay Ismoyo AFP/Getty Images

There's some soul-searching going on in the military these days.

The latest scandal to hit U.S. troops fighting in Afghanistan surfaced last week when The Los Angeles Times published photographs showing smiling American soldiers holding up body parts of a Taliban suicide bomber.

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta addressed the latest incident during a trip to Brussels.

"That behavior that was depicted in those photos absolutely violates both our regulations and, more importantly, our core values," he said last week after a NATO meeting.

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1:34am

Tue April 24, 2012
National Security

'Convention' Of Convicted Terrorists At N.Y. Trial

Originally published on Tue April 24, 2012 8:27 am

Bosnian-born Adis Medunjanin is accused of playing a role in the 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways. This photo of Medunjanin was provided by the U.S. attorney's office in Brooklyn, N.Y.
AP

There have been hundreds of terrorism trials in the U.S. since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, but the case unfolding in Brooklyn, N.Y., is different. While its focus is on defendant Adis Medunjanin and the role he allegedly played in a 2009 plot to bomb New York City subways, the trial itself breaks new ground. It marks the first time the public is hearing in open court about real al-Qaida plots from the people the terrorist group actually dispatched to carry them out.

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4:24am

Thu April 19, 2012
National Security

Secret Service Forces Out 3 Agents

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, frpm NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

The Secret Service scandal has now cost three men their jobs. The government says they were involved in misconduct in South America, and they are leaving the agency. Agents, as well as military personnel, allegedly hired prostitutes in advance of President Obama's recent trip to Colombia.

NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson has been following this story. She's in our studios. Good morning.

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6:00am

Thu April 12, 2012
The Two-Way

Suspect In USS Cole Bombing Wins One Legal Battle

Originally published on Thu April 12, 2012 6:04 am

Al-Nashiri, pictured in 2002, is being held at the Naval base in Guantanamo Bay.
Reuters/Landov

The man accused of masterminding the bombing of the USS Cole in Yemen in 2000, Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, won a key battle at Guantanamo on Wednesday — a judge said he could meet with his lawyers without having to wear restraints.

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