National

7:47am

Wed March 21, 2012
U.S.

Was Trayvon Martin's Killing A Federal Hate Crime?

A memorial to 17-year-old Trayvon Martin outside the community in Sanford, Fla., where the teen was shot.
Roberto Gonzalez Getty Images

Civil rights groups cheered the news that the Justice Department would look into the case of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed black teen shot by a man on neighborhood watch in Sanford, Fla.

But the bar for the Justice Department to make a federal case is high. Ultimately, it has few options at its disposal when it comes to investigating the teen's death.

Former prosecutors say one key tool passed early in the Obama administration might apply in this case: the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act.

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6:50am

Wed March 21, 2012

6:35am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

Trayvon Martin's Killer Had Been Accused Of Violence In The Past

George Zimmerman, in a 2005 mug shot provided by the Orange County (Fla.) jail, via The Miami Herald.
AP
  • Kathy Lohr, on 'Morning Edition'

As national attention continues to be focused on the killing of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., last month and the questions it resurrects about race relations in the U.S., The Orlando Sentinel today adds to what's known about George Zimmerman, the 28-year-old man who pulled the trigger.

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6:05am

Wed March 21, 2012
The Two-Way

'Time' Magazine Is Back With Its '140 Best Twitter Feeds'

Andy's one of the best, Time says.
@acarvin

For those who like Twitter and might want to check out some highly recommended feeds, Time magazine is again out with its list of the "140 best."

Just like last year, our colleague Andy Carvin (@acarvin) is among those in the "News & Information" category.

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2:04am

Wed March 21, 2012
Law

FBI Still Struggling With Supreme Court's GPS Ruling

Originally published on Wed March 21, 2012 11:11 am

FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies before a House Appropriations Committee panel on March 7.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

Earlier this year, the Supreme Court said police had overstepped their legal authority by planting a GPS tracker on the car of a suspected drug dealer without getting a search warrant. It seemed like another instance in a long line of cases that test the balance between personal privacy and the needs of law enforcement.

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