National

8:47am

Tue April 16, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Investigating The Boston Marathon Bombings

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:04 pm

Morning Edition co-hosts Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss the investigation of Monday's Boston Marathon explosions with Roger Cressey, a former counterterrorism investigator and member of the National Security Council, and NPR's Dina Temple-Raston.

8:45am

Tue April 16, 2013
The Two-Way

Shattered Family: Blast Killed Boy, Wounded Mom & Sister

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 12:16 pm

This undated photo provided by Bill Richard, shows his son, Martin Richard, in Boston. Martin Richard, 8, was among the at least three people killed in the explosions, Monday, April 15, 2013, at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.
Uncredited AP/Bill Richard

There will be many heartbreaking stories in coming hours and days about the victims of Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon.

Among the first such tragic tales is that of the Richard family from Dorchester, Mass.

As the local Dorchester Reporter writes:

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6:58am

Tue April 16, 2013
The Two-Way

Social Media Helped Find Loved Ones After Marathon Bombing

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 10:22 am

A runner uses his cellphone after two bombs exploded at the Boston Marathon on Monday.
Alex Trautwig Getty Images

In the chaos and mayhem that followed the Boston Marathon bombing, many people were frantic to learn the fate of friends and loved ones who were either in the race or watched it from the sidelines.

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6:12am

Tue April 16, 2013

6:06am

Tue April 16, 2013
The Two-Way

The Cruelest Month: Boston Blasts Join List Of Dark Incidents

Originally published on Tue April 16, 2013 11:04 am

Oklahoma City Bombing: The Albert P. Murrah Federal Building shows the devastation caused by a fuel and fertilizer truck bomb on April 19, 1995. The blast killed 168 people and injured more than 500.
Bob Daemmrich AFP/Getty Images

Howard Berkes is an NPR correspondent based in Salt Lake City.

It may have been the dumbest thing I ever said. On April 19, 1999, I stood before an audience at Idaho State University in Pocatello, talking about the cruelest month. April, I pointed out, and April 19 in particular, have provided celebrated, infamous and sometimes horrific moments in our history.

What was it about the month, I wondered, or the time of year, that made April so meaningful and at times so cruel? Back then, the list was relatively short:

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