National

10:12am

Thu June 14, 2012
The Two-Way

20,000 Pages Of Boy Scouts' 'Perversion Files' Ordered Opened In Oregon

The state of Oregon's Supreme Court ruled today that "20,000 pages of so-called perversion files compiled by the Boy Scouts on suspected child abusers over a period of 20 years" must be opened to the public, The Associated Press reports.

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9:34am

Thu June 14, 2012
The Two-Way

Your Shoes May Say A Lot About You

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 8:43 pm

We can tell you now: These are Mark's.
Mark Memmott NPR

Shoes can supposedly tell us more about a person than just whether they're sensible or stylish.

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7:59am

Thu June 14, 2012
The Two-Way

It's Not Only Flag Day - It's Flag Week

J. Scott Applewhite AP

June 14 is the day chosen by Congress in 1949 as Flag Day in the U.S., an action officially signed into law by President Harry Truman. But it's not just a single day - the observance lasts for a week.

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5:07am

Thu June 14, 2012
Strange News

Study: Shoes Tell A Lot About A Person

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. They say to understand a man, walk a mile in his shoes. Research from the University of Kansas suggests you don't even need to do that. The new study found judgments based on simply looking at someone's shoes, were right 90 percent of the time.

Shoes can reveal age, income, emotional state and political preference. Liberals really do wear shabby shoes and extroverts, flashy ones. Oddly, those in uncomfortable shoes tended to be calm.

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3:06am

Thu June 14, 2012
Law

Michigan Finally Eyeing Changes To Lawyers For Poor

Originally published on Fri June 15, 2012 10:05 am

Edward Carter's conviction for a 1974 crime was vacated by a judge after it was shown that Carter was innocent — and after he had spent 35 years in Michigan prisons.
Brakkton Booker NPR

Lawyers on all sides agree the system enshrined nearly 50 years ago that gives all defendants the right to a lawyer is not working. The Justice Department calls it a crisis — such a big problem that it's been doling out grants to improve how its adversaries perform in criminal cases.

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