Nepal

5:25am

Thu May 23, 2013
World

Octogenarian Rivals Race To Top Of Mount Everest

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Five years ago, at the age of 75, a Japanese mountaineer raced a 76-year-old Nepalese climber to the top of Mount Everest. Japan's Yuichiro Miura lost. This morning, in an epic rematch, the now 80-year-old Miura won, becoming the oldest person ever to reach the summit. But that record may not last. Next week, his Nepalese rival, at 81, plans to make the ascent again. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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12:36pm

Mon April 29, 2013
The Two-Way

High On Mount Everest, Climbers Clash With Sherpas

On Mount Everest, a fistfight allegedly broke out near Camp Three, between climbers and Sherpas. This file photo shows the view from Camp Three at 24,000 feet on the mountain's Lhotse Face.
Courtesy of Alan Arnette AP

Three climbers have halted their expedition on Mount Everest, after an argument with the Sherpas who were guiding them devolved into an alleged fistfight on the mountain.

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8:15am

Fri March 8, 2013
Shots - Health News

A Man's Journey From Nepal To Texas Triggers Global TB Scramble

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 10:47 am

Although tuberculosis is declining around the world, drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are on the rise.
NIAID/Flickr.com

We don't know too much about a Nepalese man who's in medical isolation in Texas while being treated for extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, or XDR-TB, the most difficult-to-treat kind. Health authorities are keen to protect his privacy.

But we do know that he traveled through 13 countries — from South Asia to somewhere in the Persian Gulf to Latin America — before he entered the U.S. illegally from Mexico in late November. He traveled by plane, bus, boat, car and on foot.

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5:33am

Tue February 26, 2013
World

Female Sherpa Makes Record Climbs

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 7:44 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

Few can say they've reached the summit of Mt. Everest, and even fewer can say they've done it twice. And only one woman can say she's done it twice in one month. Her name is Chhurim, a 29-year-old Sherpa from Nepal. She made the climb last May, came down for a few days and then turned around and went up again. This week, she climbed into the Guinness Book of World Records.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

7:19am

Wed October 31, 2012
The Salt

The Truth About Nepal's Blood-Drinking Festivals

Originally published on Mon November 12, 2012 1:44 pm

Yaks roam the hills in the Mustang District, in Nepal's Dhaulagiri Zone. Every day during the annual blood-drinking festival, attendees wait and watch for the yaks. Only male yaks are bled.
Jana Asenbrennerova

"Blood-drinking festival." Reading those words, it's hard not to get either creeped out or curious — especially around Halloween.

I opted for curiosity. Which is how I discovered photojournalist Jana Asenbrennerova's stunning photo essay on an obscure custom that takes place each year in the remote, mist-wrapped highlands of Nepal. These festivals are actually a reflection of the complex relationship that Nepal's Buddhists have with eating meat.

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