Nigeria

12:57am

Thu April 26, 2012
Asia

An African Trader And The Perils Of Business In China

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 8:31 am

Kelvin Njubigbo, one of the many African traders in the southern Chinese city of Guangzhou, made two profitable trips to the city from his native Nigeria. On his third trip, he was robbed of $19,000.
Nina Porzucki for NPR

It's dinnertime at a bustling Kentucky Fried Chicken in the Little Africa neighborhood of Guangzhou, in southern China. Chinese schoolgirls nibble on fries, a grandmother feeds her grandson, and Kelvin Njubigbo stares at a single wing on his tray. His foot, wrapped in a gauze bandage, juts out from the table.

"Everything is risk in life," repeats Njubigbo. "It's all risk from the beginning to the last."

Read more

8:55am

Thu March 15, 2012
The Two-Way

Nigerian Leaders May Be In Talks With Boko Haram Militants

Onlookers view the wreckage of a car bomb that exploded outside a church near Madalla, Nigeria on Christmas Day, 2011 killing scores of people. Boko Haram claimed responsibility for the attack.
Sunday Aghaeze AP

Nigerian authorities may be holding indirect talks with leaders of Boko Haram, the Islamist militant group responsible for scores of bombing attacks, according to Reuters. The militant group is infamous for its violence, such as the bombing of the UN building in Abuja last August, and deadly church bombings on Christmas Day, 2011 that killed 35.

Read more
Tags: 

1:00pm

Sun January 29, 2012
Africa

Attacks By Nigerian Muslim Group Stirs Fear

A radical Islamist group in northern Nigeria has claimed responsibility for a series of deadly bombing attacks last week that left more than 200 people dead. Boko Haram's campaign of violence has left minority Christians on edge in the city of Kano.

Tags: 

10:01pm

Tue January 24, 2012
Africa

Nigeria's President Under Pressure To Quell Violence

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan (left) walks with the Emir of Kano Ado Bayero during a one-day visit to the city that was rocked by recent attacks.
Aminu Abuabakar AFP/Getty Images

Kano, the largest city in Nigeria's Muslim north, is an ancient, sprawling city of more than 9 million. Last Friday, the Muslim day of prayers was shattered by a series of coordinated bomb blasts.

Just down the street from one of the main market areas in the city, the street remains blocked off from a police station hit in the attacks. The radical Islamist sect Boko Haram claimed responsibility.

Sagir Ali, a security guard at a parking lot at the market, says he watched as nearby government offices were attacked.

Read more
Tags: 

Pages