Obituaries

9:23am

Thu February 28, 2013
The Two-Way

Mastermind Of Great Train Robbery Dies

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 10:26 am

The Great Train Robbers (from left): Buster Edwards, Tom Wisbey, Jim White, Bruce Reynolds, Roger Cordrey, Charlie Wilson and Jim Hussey, with copies of their book The Train Robbers in 1979.
Michael Fresco Getty Images

Bruce Reynolds, the brains behind the Great Train Robbery of 1963, has died at the age of 81, nearly five decades after he and his partners in crime made off with 2.6 million pounds at Ledburn, Buckinghamshire, England.

Reynolds was part of the gang that executed an elaborate scheme to swipe the cash from the Glasgow-to-Euston mail train. The clockwork nature of the crime, along with the fact that the bulk of the loot was never recovered and some of the robbers never captured, has made it a favorite subject of television and films, as well as popular music.

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2:28pm

Wed February 27, 2013
Deceptive Cadence

Remembering Van Cliburn, A Giant Among Pianists And A Cold War Idol

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 9:37 am

A youthful Van Cliburn, captured mid-concerto.
Courtesy of the Van Cliburn Foundation

11:00am

Wed February 27, 2013
The Two-Way

Van Cliburn, Renowned American Concert Pianist, Dies

Originally published on Wed February 27, 2013 11:22 am

U.S. pianist Van Cliburn in 1963.
Evening Standard Getty Images

The American concert pianist Harvey Lavan "Van" Cliburn has died, according to the Associated Press, who is quoting a representative.

Cliburn achieved worldwide recognition when he won the first International Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow as a 23-year-old. What's more he did so in 1958, at the height of the Cold War.

The Dallas Morning News reports that Cliburn died in his mansion in Fort Worth, Texas. He had been diagnosed with bone cancer.

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3:53pm

Mon February 25, 2013
Remembrances

Koop Turned Surgeon General's Office Into Mighty Education Platform

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 11:34 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

C. Everett Koop was the most outspoken and some would argue the most influential of all U.S. surgeon generals. [POST-BROADCAST CORRECTION: The correct plural form of the word is surgeons general.] He wore the uniform throughout most of the 1980s, and he turned an office with little power into a mighty platform - to educate Americans about AIDS prevention and the dangers of smoking.

C. Everett Koop died today at his home in Hanover, New Hampshire. He was 96. NPR's Joseph Shapiro looks back on his career.

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3:35pm

Mon February 25, 2013
The Two-Way

C. Everett Koop, Surgeon General Who Fought Against Smoking, AIDS, Dies

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 3:37 pm

Former Surgeon General of the United States C. Everett Koop.
Geisel School of Medicine

C. Everett Koop, known as America's Family Doctor during his tenure as surgeon general from 1981 to 1989, died today at his home in Hanover, N.H., Dartmouth announced.

He was 96.

Koop made a name for himself for the surprising stands he took during the AIDS epidemic, as well as for his efforts fighting for a smoke-free country.

The Associated Press reports:

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