Pakistan

3:08am

Thu April 19, 2012
Asia

Avalanche May Alter Himalayan Combat Zone

Originally published on Thu April 19, 2012 3:44 pm

Pakistani army soldiers work Wednesday at the site of a massive avalanche that buried 140 people, including 129 soldiers, April 7 at the Siachen glacier. Pakistan's army chief called for the peaceful resolution of the Himalayan glacier dispute with rival nuclear power India.
B.K. Bangash AP

In the chill of the world's highest combat zone lies the prospect of warmer relations. Pakistan's army chief said Wednesday that there's a need to resolve the conflict that has Indian and Pakistani troops facing off at frigid altitudes of up to 20,000 feet in the Himalayan Mountains. An estimated 3,000 Pakistani soldiers have died from the atrocious weather conditions since deployments on the Siachen glacier began in 1984.

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2:00am

Mon April 9, 2012
Asia

Leaders' Meeting Boosts India-Pakistan Relations

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 8:15 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A brief encounter between two leaders has raised hope for better relations between India and Pakistan. India's prime minister hosted Pakistan's president and accepted a return invitation to travel to Pakistan. We talk here of two nuclear-armed rivals whose relations were even worse than usual, after Pakistani militants attacked Mumbai in 2008. And the meeting came as disaster struck Pakistani troops facing Indian soldiers in the Himalayas.

NPR's Julie McCarthy is going to talk us through all this. Hi, Julie.

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10:08am

Wed April 4, 2012
The Two-Way

In News Conference, Pakistani Militant Taunts U.S. Over $10 Million Bounty

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed, chief of Jamaat-ud-Dawwa and founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, listens to a reporter during his interview with the Associated Press in Islamabad, Pakistan on Tuesday.
B.K. Bangash AP

Hafiz Mohammad Saeed said he's not in hiding. In fact, he said, he would be Lahore tomorrow, if the United States wanted to capture him.

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6:45am

Mon April 2, 2012
The Two-Way

Bin Laden's Wives, Daughters Sentenced To 45 Days Detention, Deportation

Originally published on Mon April 2, 2012 7:21 am

Pakistani security personnel stand guard outside the house in Islamabad where family members of al-Qaida chief Osama bin Laden are being held.
Aamir Qureshi AFP/Getty Images

"A Pakistani court on Monday convicted Osama bin Laden's three widows and two of his grown-up daughters of illegal residency, sentencing them to 45 days detention and ordering their deportation," Pakistan's Dawn newspaper reports.

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8:30am

Fri March 30, 2012
The Two-Way

Bin Laden Fathered 4 Children, Hid In 5 Safe Houses While On Run, Wife Says

During the raid on Osama bin Laden's compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, a video showing the al-Qaida leader watching television was discovered.
AFP/Getty Images

During nine years on the run in Pakistan, Osama bin Laden used at least five safe houses and fathered four children, the youngest of his three wives has told Pakistani investigators, according to The New York Times.

Amal Ahmad Abdul Fateh, now 30, married bin Laden in 2000.

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