Portland

4:43am

Fri October 25, 2013
Around the Nation

How To Solve A Sky-High Commuting Conundrum

Originally published on Wed October 30, 2013 3:03 pm

Commuters headed to Oregon Health and Science University use cars, bikes and streetcars to connect with Portland's aerial tram, which whisks them up and over south waterfront neighborhoods.
David P. Gilkey NPR

This story is part of a series on commuting in America.

Imagine a hospital on top of a mountain. How would doctors and patients get in and out? In Portland, Ore., commuters don't have to drive up a twisty, two-lane road to get there. Instead, they glide up 500 feet in the air in a gleaming silver gondola.

Portland's aerial tram connects the south waterfront down near the river to the Oregon Health and Science University on top of Marquam Hill.

For nurse Sara Hone, it has changed her commute. "I love it. I can't imagine a time without it," she says.

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10:25am

Wed October 9, 2013
Craft Beer

Meet Dave, A 19-Year-Old Craft Beer With A $2,000 Price Tag

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:00 pm

Hair of the Dog releases a few bottles of Dave a year. In September, the 12 bottles of Dave on sale for $2,000 apiece sold out within a few hours.
Courtesy of Alan Sprints

Hair of the Dog Brewery in Portland, Ore., makes a beer so rare, and so sought after, that it can fetch $2,000 a bottle.

It's called Dave. And no, it's not something out of a Portlandia sketch.

Dave is a barleywine — a strong, dark beer with 29 percent alcohol content. It's been aged for 19 years, first in oak barrels and then glass bottles.

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11:53am

Mon August 19, 2013
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: PB&J Fries

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 1:55 pm

Peter failed to hitch this to the back of his motorcycle and bring it back to Chicago for us.
NPR

Canadians have given us so much, from the BlackBerry, a kind of phone your parents' older friends used to use, to Leslie Hope, the lady who played Kiefer Sutherland's wife in Season 1 of 24. But perhaps towering above all is poutine, which translated from the Quebecois is "stuff poured onto french fries." Usually it's some variation of cheese, meat and gravy, but I was told that in Portland, Ore. (naturally), at a food truck (naturally), you can get peanut butter and jelly on fries. So I went, naturally.

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2:51am

Sat August 10, 2013
Food

Pack A Pie For Your Picnic, Right In Your Hot Little Hand

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 5:43 am

Baker Kim Boyce's hand pies can be filled with a variety of fruits, from apricots to blackberries. The fruit's natural sugars and juices caramelize while baking, concentrating the summer flavors.
Deena Prichep for NPR

Late summer is high season for delicious, juicy fruits, from Georgia peaches to Maine blueberries. Naturally, that gets many bakers thinking pie. But taking a big, drippy pie on a picnic can be a pretty sloppy prospect.

Kim Boyce, a baker in Portland, Ore., has solved this problem. For picnics, she bakes up hand pies: Sturdy little fruit-filled turnovers that don't require a knife and fork. Boyce makes 60 or 70 a day at her bakery.

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10:45am

Tue July 16, 2013
The Salt

Local Sake: America's Craft Brewers Look East For Inspiration

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 11:29 am

Yoed Anis, president of the Texas Sake Company, says "the only constraint holding us back" from faster growth is the absence of a sufficient and consistent rice supply.
Courtesy Texas Sake Company

Most of us are familiar with that hot, musky-smelling, cloudy drink served in teacups at sushi bars and sometimes called, erroneously, "rice wine." In other words, most of us have had bad sake.

But finally, Americans are learning to love the good stuff.

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