Privacy

1:01pm

Sun February 17, 2013
All Tech Considered

Want To Keep Your Messages Private? There's An App For That

Originally published on Sun February 17, 2013 6:46 pm

Cell phone communication can be hacked, tapped or otherwise tampered with. A new app aims to change that.
iStockphoto

It sounds like something out of a spy movie: A new app called Silent Circle allows users to "burn" sensitive messages sent on their phones.

Jon Callas, one of the people who developed the app, says the idea is pretty simple.

"It's a timer. So you can say, one hour; seven minutes. Whatever," Callas tells Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

It's called a "burn notice." When the time's up, the text is erased from both the sender and receiver's phones.

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6:15am

Wed January 30, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: Your Salary Data May Be For Sale

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 4:42 pm

Fill out an application for a loan, and your wage history may go places you didn't expect.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

If you've earned a paycheck in recent years, you'll probably want want to know about this:

The Equifax credit reporting agency, NBC News reports, has collected 190 million employment and salary records on about one-third of U.S. adults and has sold some of the information "to debt collectors, financial service companies and other entities."

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1:02am

Wed January 30, 2013
Asia

In China, The Government Isn't The Only Spy Game In Town

Originally published on Wed January 30, 2013 8:44 am

A man sells surveillance cameras at the main electronics market in Tienhe district, Guangzhou, in southern China's Guangdong province, on Aug. 8.
EPA /Landov

The final of two reports

It all started with a local Chinese official.

He couldn't figure out how his wife, who suspected him of having an affair, knew the contents of his private conversations.

"His wife knew things that he said in his car and office, including conversations over the telephone," recalls Qi Hong, a former journalist from Shandong province in eastern China, and a friend of the official.

So Qi asked a buddy who owned bug-detecting equipment to help.

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6:36am

Tue January 29, 2013
Asia

In China, Beware: A Camera May Be Watching You

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 6:16 pm

The use of security cameras such as these, looking out over Tiananmen Square in Beijing, is on the rise in China. Critics say the government is using them to discourage dissidents.
Ed Jones AFP/Getty Images

The first of two reports

China is becoming a surveillance state. In recent years, the government has installed more than 20 million cameras across a country where a decade ago there weren't many.

Today, in Chinese cities, cameras are everywhere: on highways, in public parks, on balconies, in elevators, in taxis, even in the stands at sporting events.

Officials say the cameras help combat crime and maintain "social stability" — a euphemism for shutting up critics.

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1:34am

Mon January 28, 2013
Digital Life

Google Posts How It Handles Requests For Users' Data

Originally published on Mon January 28, 2013 8:11 am

Google wants you to know you're being watched. Or rather, the company wants you to know how and when the police get to watch what you do online.

For the first time, the company has posted its policies for when it gives up users' information to the government. It's part of a broader company strategy to push for tougher privacy laws.

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