Privacy

3:40pm

Tue July 31, 2012
Media

Newspaper Takes A Stand On Anonymous Commenters

Originally published on Tue July 31, 2012 5:09 pm

Linda Cook eventually revealed herself as the commenter who made a disparaging remark about an Idaho Republican Party official online.
Sandy Clemons Courtesy of Linda Cook

The Internet is slowly becoming a less anonymous place. YouTube has a new policy encouraging commenters to use their real names, and many news sites have switched to a login system run by Facebook.

News sites that still allow anonymous comments are finding there are legal risks. The Spokesman-Review newspaper in Spokane, Wash., has spent the last few months trying to protect the identity of a reader who saw a photo of a Republican Party official in Idaho named Tina Jacobson, and then posted a disparaging comment.

Read more

4:54pm

Fri June 8, 2012
The Two-Way

Very Few Users Vote On Facebook's Privacy Changes

Facebook's logo.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

At the beginning of this month, we told you that Facebook was giving its users the opportunity to vote up or down on changes to its privacy policy.

Voting closed today and Mashable didn't mince its words when it described the results: "Facebook Election Is a Bust: 0.00038% of Users Voted On Privacy Change," was its headline.

Read more

12:16pm

Thu June 7, 2012
The Two-Way

Like LinkedIn, Last.fm And eHarmony Suffer Password Breach

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 1:21 pm

Last.fm

Last.fm and eHarmony became the latest websites to suffer security breaches that put the passwords of some of their users at risk.

In a statement on its website, Last.fm, which tracks and recommends music, said it was investigating the leaked passwords and asked all its users to "change their passwords immediately."

The dating site EHarmony said it had reset the passwords of those members whose passwords had been compromised.

Read more

12:43pm

Mon June 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Report: Facebook Weighing Access For The Under 13 Crowd

Originally published on Mon June 4, 2012 1:14 pm

Perhaps in a effort to widen its reach, Facebook is exploring ways in which to officially open up its services to kids younger than 13.

That's what The Wall Street Journal reported today adding that Facebook is already used by millions of kids who lie about their age.

The Journal reports:

Read more

2:59pm

Tue May 29, 2012
National Security

Watching Big Brother: Privacy Board Delayed

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 6:45 pm

Homeland Security analysts watch for threats to U.S. technological infrastructure at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center.
Jim Watson AFP/Getty Images

Congress is considering legislation allowing the government to search through Internet traffic for early warnings of cyberattacks. The bills are controversial — worries about government surveillance have led to protests online.

The government does have a tool that could calm fears about this kind of legislation — it just doesn't use it.

Read more

Pages