Race Ethnicity & Culture

8:17am

Fri June 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Ignoring Racist Tweets, 11-Year-Old Nails National Anthem ... Again

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 1:24 pm

Sebastien de la Cruz, known as San Antonio's Little Mariachi, sings the national anthem before the start of Game 4 of the NBA finals on Thursday.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

11:34am

Thu June 13, 2013
The Two-Way

Federal Judge To Face Rare Review Over Controversial Remarks

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 1:09 pm

This undated photo provided by the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals shows Judge Edith Jones.
Anonymous Court of Appeals via AP

The story of U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge Edith Jones involves a controversial speech to the Federalist Society, calls of racism, last-ditch efforts to stop an execution and now a rare formal disciplinary review by the Judicial Council of the District of Columbia Circuit.

The case has been bubbling for the past couple of weeks. It's complicated, but interesting, so we'll tell you about it in chronological order.

Read more

10:39am

Wed June 12, 2013
The Two-Way

50 Years Later, Medgar Evers' Widow Relives The Pain

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:12 am

Keynote speaker Myrlie Evers-Williams at Wagner College's commencement ceremony on May 24.
Jan Somma-Hammel Staten Island Advance /Landov

As NPR's Debbie Elliott has reported for Morning Edition and on the Code Switch blog, "for Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers, the memories of 1963 are still raw."

Read more

1:18am

Tue June 11, 2013
The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

A Daughter's Struggle To Overcome A Legacy Of Segregation

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 7:13 am

Alabama Gov. George Wallace (right) blocks the door of the the Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala., on June 11, 1963. Wallace, who had vowed to prevent integration of the campus, gave way to federal troops.
AP

As we head into the summer months, NPR is looking back to the summer of 1963, a momentous year in civil rights history. As part of NPR's partnership with The Race Card Project, which asks people to distill their thoughts on race to six words, Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris is asking people who were on the front lines of history to share their memories and their thoughts on race in America today.

Read more

12:56am

Mon June 10, 2013
Shots - Health News

African-Americans Remain Hardest Hit By Medical Bills

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:37 am

Mike Jackson has diabetes and high blood pressure. His eye was damaged after he cut back on insulin because he couldn't afford it.
Bryan Terry for NPR

For many years, high medical bills have been a leading cause of financial distress and bankruptcy in America. That pressure may be easing ever so slightly, according to a survey released earlier this week by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

But 1 in 5 Americans still face hardships due to medical costs — and African-Americans continue to be the hardest hit.

Read more

Pages