Science

4:37am

Sat May 5, 2012
Space

Look Up: Tonight, 'Supermoon' Is Closer To Earth

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 8:49 am

The statue of Freedom, atop of the U.S. Capitol Building, is pictured against a "supermoon" on March 19, 2011.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Head outside at sunset tonight and look up at the sky. If the full moon seems a tad larger than normal to you, that means one of two things: You are exceptionally perceptive, or you were already expecting to be dazzled, after hearing some of the buzz about this year's "supermoon."

It turns out that all full moons are not created equal. That's because the moon's orbit around the Earth isn't a perfect circle — it's an ellipse. And tonight, we're in luck.

Read more
Tags: 

1:21pm

Fri May 4, 2012
The Two-Way

Earthquakes! High Tides! No, Just Super Moon

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 5:52 pm

A super moon rises above a shopping center in Manchester, Britain, on March 19, 2011.
Jon Super AP

It won't trigger any catastrophes, according to scientists, but the Moon will orbit to its closest proximity to the Earth on Saturday night. It's called a "super moon": when a full moon reaches perigee near our planet.

Read more

10:12am

Fri May 4, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Who Killed Men's Hats? Think Of A Three Letter Word Beginning With 'I'

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 8:59 am

Allison Joyce Getty Images

A hundred years ago — and that's when this picture was taken, in 1912 — men didn't leave home without a hat. Boys wore caps. This is a socialist political rally in Union Square in Manhattan. There may be a bare head or two in this crowd, but I think those heads are women's.

Here's another rally, Union Square again. This time it's an Occupy Wall Street demonstration. A hundred years have passed. Same place. Same kind of crowd. But this time: hardly a hat.

Read more

5:06am

Fri May 4, 2012
Space

Photographers, Skywatchers Prepare For Supermoon

Originally published on Fri May 4, 2012 7:57 am

1:04am

Thu May 3, 2012
Humans

Put Away The Bell Curve: Most Of Us Aren't 'Average'

Originally published on Thu May 3, 2012 9:06 pm

Hank Aaron breaks Babe Ruth's record for career home runs as he hits No. 715 at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium on April 8, 1974, on his way to a career 755 home runs. Research suggests that in a wide variety of professions, including collegiate and professional sports, a small but significant number of individuals perform exceedingly well and the rest of individuals' performance trails off.
AP

For decades, teachers, managers and parents have assumed that the performance of students and employees fits what's known as the bell curve — in most activities, we expect a few people to be very good, a few people to be very bad and most people to be average.

The bell curve powerfully shapes how we think of human performance: If lots of students or employees happen to show up as extreme outliers — they're either very good or very bad — we assume they must represent a skewed sample, because only a few people in a truly random sample are supposed to be outliers.

Read more

Pages