Science

2:30pm

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

Waiting For A Sign: Mars Rover To Land On Its Own

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 9:49 pm

An artist's concept of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft depicts the final minute before the rover, Curiosity, touches down on the surface of Mars.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

9:16am

Sun August 5, 2012
Science

Climbing With Chaos

Unsure of how to pick the hand and foot holds for an indoor rock climb? Try using chaos theory and a computer.
Jessica McDonald KUNC

Rock climbing is not on the list of sports at this summer’s Olympic Games in London. But for many Coloradans, rock climbing is a natural test of one’s athleticism—and wits. For one recent computer science graduate, rock climbing not only got him through school, but it became a topic of academic study.

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7:44am

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

Opportunity To Be Less Lonely As Latest NASA Rover To Land On Mars

Opportunity on the rim of the Santa Maria Crater, seen by the MRO in 2011.
NASA

NASA has three rovers on Mars right now: the twins Opportunity and Spirit, and the Sojourner. Of those three, only Opportunity is operational and is set to be joined by Curiosity on Sunday night.

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5:34am

Sun August 5, 2012
Space

How This Mission To Mars Is Different From Others

NPR's Joe Palca will be at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to monitor the Mars mission landing Sunday night at 10:30 p.m. PDT. Palca talks with guest host Linda Wertheimer about the Mars landing and purpose of the mission.

4:11am

Sun August 5, 2012
Joe's Big Idea

Scientists Look To Martian Rocks For History Of Life

Originally published on Sun August 5, 2012 9:41 am

Mmm, nice rock! This rover's looking for secrets to the history of life on Mars.
Photo Illustration Courtesy NASA

NASA has sent rovers to explore Mars before. But three words explain what makes this latest mission to Mars so different: location, location, location.

The rover Curiosity is slated to land late Sunday in Gale Crater, near the base of a 3-mile-high mountain with layers like the Grand Canyon. Scientists think those rocks could harbor secrets about the history of water — and life — on the Red Planet.

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